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Emissions of CO2 from road freight transport in London: Trends and policies for long run reductions

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  • Zanni, Alberto M.
  • Bristow, Abigail L.

Abstract

Freight transport has been receiving increasing attention in both literature and practice following the growing recognition of its importance in urban transport planning. This paper analyses historical and projected road freight CO2 emissions in the city of London and explores the potential mitigation effect of a set of freight transport policies and logistics solutions. Findings indicate a range of policies with potential to reduce emissions in the period up to 2050. However, this reduction would appear to only be capable of partly counterbalancing the projected increase in freight traffic. More profound behavioural measures therefore appear to be necessary for London's CO2 emissions reduction targets to be met.

Suggested Citation

  • Zanni, Alberto M. & Bristow, Abigail L., 2010. "Emissions of CO2 from road freight transport in London: Trends and policies for long run reductions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1774-1786, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:4:p:1774-1786
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schwanen, Tim & Banister, David & Anable, Jillian, 2011. "Scientific research about climate change mitigation in transport: A critical review," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 993-1006.
    2. Mustapa, Siti Indati & Bekhet, Hussain Ali, 2016. "Analysis of CO2 emissions reduction in the Malaysian transportation sector: An optimisation approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 171-183.
    3. Taefi, Tessa T. & Kreutzfeldt, Jochen & Held, Tobias & Fink, Andreas, 2016. "Supporting the adoption of electric vehicles in urban road freight transport – A multi-criteria analysis of policy measures in Germany," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 61-79.
    4. Siti Indati Mustapa & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2015. "Investigating Factors Affecting CO2 Emissions in Malaysian Road Transport Sector," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(4), pages 1073-1083.
    5. Hao, Han & Geng, Yong & Li, Weiqi & Guo, Bin, 2015. "Energy consumption and GHG emissions from China's freight transport sector: Scenarios through 2050," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 94-101.
    6. Lebeau, Philippe & Macharis, Cathy & Van Mierlo, Joeri, 2016. "Exploring the choice of battery electric vehicles in city logistics: A conjoint-based choice analysis," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 245-258.
    7. Ozen, Murat & Tuydes-Yaman, Hediye, 2013. "Evaluation of emission cost of inefficiency in road freight transportation in Turkey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 625-636.
    8. Zanni, Alberto M & Goulden, Murray & Ryley, Tim & Dingwall, Robert, 2017. "Improving scenario methods in infrastructure planning: A case study of long distance travel and mobility in the UK under extreme weather uncertainty and a changing climate," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 180-197.

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