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Integration of regional electricity markets in Australia: A price convergence assessment

Listed author(s):
  • Apergis, Nicholas
  • Fontini, Fulvio
  • Inchauspe, Julian

From an electricity market design perspective, it is relevant and practical to know which market structures allow for price convergence, and how long this takes to achieve. This study employs the Phillips and Sul (2007, 2009) methodology to test for the convergence of wholesale electricity prices across the Australian States. We identify a long-run, common price growth pattern that applies to a cluster formed by three Eastern States that share common market characteristics and limited physical interconnection. We also find another cluster with less competitive market structures that, although not interconnected, strongly converge towards their own trend. These findings confirm theoretical expectations while quantifying the rate of convergence. Finally, we also investigate the role that the carbon tax regime has played in the convergence process, with new empirical showing that the previous results are not affected, with the notable exception being the case of South Australia.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988316301700
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 62 (2017)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 411-418

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:411-418
DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2016.06.022
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

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  1. Peter C. B. Phillips & Donggyu Sul, 2009. "Economic transition and growth," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 1153-1185.
  2. Ma, Hengyun & Oxley, Les, 2012. "The emergence and evolution of regional convergence clusters in China's energy markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 82-94.
  3. Peter C. B. Phillips & Donggyu Sul, 2007. "Transition Modeling and Econometric Convergence Tests," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(6), pages 1771-1855, November.
  4. Bernard, Andrew B. & Durlauf, Steven N., 1996. "Interpreting tests of the convergence hypothesis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 161-173.
  5. Helen Higgs, 2009. "Modelling price and volatility inter-relationships in the Australian wholesale spot electricity markets," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:200904, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
  6. Raymond Li, Roselyne Joyeux, and Ronald D. Ripple, 2014. "International Natural Gas market Integration," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
  7. Hodrick, Robert J & Prescott, Edward C, 1997. "Postwar U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, February.
  8. Meng, Ming & Payne, James E. & Lee, Junsoo, 2013. "Convergence in per capita energy use among OECD countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 536-545.
  9. Dempster, Gregory & Isaacs, Justin & Smith, Narin, 2008. "Price discovery in restructured electricity markets," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 250-259, May.
  10. Higgs, Helen, 2009. "Modelling price and volatility inter-relationships in the Australian wholesale spot electricity markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 748-756, September.
  11. Worthington, Andrew & Kay-Spratley, Adam & Higgs, Helen, 2005. "Transmission of prices and price volatility in Australian electricity spot markets: a multivariate GARCH analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 337-350, March.
  12. Rabindra Nepal and John Foster, 2016. "Testing for Market Integration in the Australian National Electricity Market," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
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