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Differences in nutritional outcomes between Brazilian white and black children

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  • Reis, Mauricio

Abstract

This paper analyzes whether differences in nutritional outcomes between white and black children are related to disparities in socioeconomic status and how improvements in nutritional indicators for each racial group over time are associated with changes in household income, parent's education and other socioeconomic attributes. According to the results, the gap in anthropometric measures would be substantially reduced if black and white children had similar characteristics. Evidence also shows that better economic and social attributes explain only a small part of the large improvement in nutritional measures verified between 2002–2003 and 2008–2009 for both racial groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Reis, Mauricio, 2012. "Differences in nutritional outcomes between Brazilian white and black children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 174-188.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:2:p:174-188
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2011.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ayllón, Sara & Ferreira-Batista, Natalia N., 2015. "‘Mommy, I miss daddy’. The effect of family structure on children's health in Brazil," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 75-89.
    2. Averett, Susan L. & Stacey, Nicholas & Wang, Yang, 2014. "Decomposing race and gender differences in underweight and obesity in South Africa," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 23-40.
    3. de Oliveira, Victor Hugo & Quintana-Domeque, Climent, 2014. "Early-life environment and adult stature in Brazil: An analysis for cohorts born between 1950 and 1980," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 67-80.
    4. Victor Hugo de Oliveira & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2014. "Early-Life Environment and Adult Stature in Brazil during the Period 1950 to 1980," Working Papers 2014-008, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nutrition; Children; Race;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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