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Differences in nutritional outcomes between Brazilian white and black children

  • Reis, Mauricio

This paper analyzes whether differences in nutritional outcomes between white and black children are related to disparities in socioeconomic status and how improvements in nutritional indicators for each racial group over time are associated with changes in household income, parent's education and other socioeconomic attributes. According to the results, the gap in anthropometric measures would be substantially reduced if black and white children had similar characteristics. Evidence also shows that better economic and social attributes explain only a small part of the large improvement in nutritional measures verified between 2002–2003 and 2008–2009 for both racial groups.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 174-188

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:2:p:174-188
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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