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Discretion vs. timeless perspective under model-consistent stabilization objectives

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  • Petrella, Ivan
  • Rossi, Raffaele
  • Santoro, Emiliano

Abstract

Recent literature has reported situations in which discretion dominates timeless perspective in the presence of elements that reduce the slope of the New Keynesian Phillips curve. Considering a model-consistent welfare metric inhibits this mechanism in the standard New Keynesian framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Petrella, Ivan & Rossi, Raffaele & Santoro, Emiliano, 2014. "Discretion vs. timeless perspective under model-consistent stabilization objectives," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 84-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:122:y:2014:i:1:p:84-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.11.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    2. Julio J. Rotemberg & Michael Woodford, 1998. "An Optimization-Based Econometric Framework for the Evaluation of Monetary Policy: Expanded Version," NBER Technical Working Papers 0233, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Basu, Susanto, 1995. "Intermediate Goods and Business Cycles: Implications for Productivity and Welfare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 512-531, June.
    4. Svensson, Lars E O, 1997. "Optimal Inflation Targets, "Conservative" Central Banks, and Linear Inflation Contracts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 98-114, March.
    5. Robert J. Barro & David B. Gordon, 2019. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural Rate Model," Credit and Capital Markets, Credit and Capital Markets, vol. 52(4), pages 505-525.
    6. Kimball, Miles S, 1995. "The Quantitative Analytics of the Basic Neomonetarist Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1241-1277, November.
    7. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    8. Petrella, Ivan & Santoro, Emiliano, 2011. "Input–output interactions and optimal monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1817-1830.
    9. Michael Dotsey & Robert G. King, 2006. "Pricing, Production, and Persistence," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(5), pages 893-928, September.
    10. Bergin, Paul R. & Feenstra, Robert C., 2000. "Staggered price setting, translog preferences, and endogenous persistence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 657-680, June.
    11. Ivan Petrella & Raffaele Rossi & Emiliano Santoro, 2019. "Monetary Policy with Sectoral Trade‐Offs," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(1), pages 55-88, January.
    12. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    13. Dennis, Richard, 2010. "When is discretion superior to timeless perspective policymaking?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 266-277, April.
    14. Sauer, Stephan, 2010. "When discretion is better: Initial conditions and the timeless perspective," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 128-130, May.
    15. Alessio Moro, 2009. "Input-Output Structure and New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 99(2), pages 145-166, April-Jun.
    16. Huang, Kevin X.D. & Liu, Zheng, 2004. "Input–Output Structure And Nominal Rigidity: The Persistence Problem Revisited," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 188-206, April.
    17. Stephan Sauer, 2010. "Discretion Rather Than Rules? When Is Discretionary Policymaking Better Than the Timeless Perspective?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 6(2), pages 1-29, June.
    18. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivan Petrella & Raffaele Rossi & Emiliano Santoro, 2019. "Monetary Policy with Sectoral Trade‐Offs," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(1), pages 55-88, January.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy; Discretion; Timeless perspective; Loss of social welfare;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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