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Beliefs about the determinants of success and employment protection

  • Kyriacou, Andreas P.

We show that part of the international variation in employment laws is due to different beliefs about the impact of hard work as opposed to luck and connections on success. In societies where a greater proportion of people relate their life prospects to chance and connections, stronger employment protection is in place. The prevalence of such beliefs is likely to hamper labor market reforms.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 116 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 31-33

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:116:y:2012:i:1:p:31-33
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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