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Worker turnover and job matching--Implications for estimating the returns to tenure

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  • Barmby, Tim
  • Eberth, Barbara

Abstract

This paper replicates Medoff and Abraham's [Medoff, J. and Abraham, K., 1980. Experience, performance, and earnings. Quarterly Journal of Economics 95, 703-736.] results where the introduction of performance ratings into an earnings equation doesn't reduce the coefficient on tenure. M&A interpret this as being worrying for Human Capital Theory. We offer an interpretation where it isn't.

Suggested Citation

  • Barmby, Tim & Eberth, Barbara, 2008. "Worker turnover and job matching--Implications for estimating the returns to tenure," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 137-139, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:101:y:2008:i:2:p:137-139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," NBER Chapters, in: Investment in Human Beings, pages 9-49, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Margaret Stevens, 2003. "Earnings Functions, Specific Human Capital, and Job Matching: Tenure Bias Is Negative," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(4), pages 783-806, October.
    3. James L. Medoff & Katharine G. Abraham, 1980. "Experience, Performance, and Earnings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 95(4), pages 703-736.
    4. Treble, John & van Gameren, Edwin & Bridges, Sarah & Barmby, Tim, 2001. "The internal economics of the firm: further evidence from personnel data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(5), pages 531-552, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aviad Tur-Sinai, 2020. "The effect of terror and economic sector in early career years on future career path," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 59(5), pages 2153-2184, November.
    2. Gaetano Lisi, 2018. "Job satisfaction, time allocation and labour supply," Working Papers 2018-04, Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Economia e Giurisprudenza.
    3. Frederiksen, Anders & Lange, Fabian & Kriechel, Ben, 2017. "Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 408-429.
    4. Gaetano Lisi, 2018. "Job satisfaction, job match quality and labour supply decisions," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 65(4), pages 489-505, December.
    5. Aviad Tur-Sinai, 0. "The effect of terror and economic sector in early career years on future career path," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-32.

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