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Negative externalities on property values resulting from water impairment: The case of the Pigeon River Watershed

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  • Cho, Seong-Hoon
  • Roberts, Roland K.
  • Kim, Seung Gyu

Abstract

The objective of this research was to determine whether willingness to bear the negative externality from water quality impairment differs between those who do and those who do not receive economic benefit from the impairment source. Differences were tested using a hedonic analysis of ambient water quality in two discrete housing markets in the Pigeon River Watershed, which have been polluted by the operation of a paper mill. The results suggest that North Carolina residents residing in subwatersheds with impaired portions of the Pigeon River, who experience economic benefit from the paper mill in addition to its harmful effects on water quality, do perceive the pollution as a negative externality. In contrast, the effects of both the degraded river and its contributing streams on property values are perceived as negative externalities by watershed residents in Tennessee who experience only harmful effects from the pollution. Differences in willingness to bear the water-impairment externality were not indicated by variables representing view of and proximity to impaired water bodies. The results suggest that the perception of water quality to which property owners implicitly apply value should be considered when establishing water-quality regulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Cho, Seong-Hoon & Roberts, Roland K. & Kim, Seung Gyu, 2011. "Negative externalities on property values resulting from water impairment: The case of the Pigeon River Watershed," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2390-2399.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:70:y:2011:i:12:p:2390-2399
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2011.07.021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Seung Gyu & Roberts, Roland K. & Jung, Suhyun, 2009. "Amenity values of spatial configurations of forest landscapes over space and time in the Southern Appalachian Highlands," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2646-2657, August.
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    1. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0049-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Masha Maslianskaia-Pautrel & Catherine Baumont pba148, 2016. "The nature and impacts of environmental spillovers on housing prices: A spatial hedonic analysis," Working Papers 2016.04, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    3. Mahesh, Ramachandran, 2015. "Validating Spatial Hedonic Modeling with a Behavioral Approach: Measuring the Impact of Water Quality Degradation on Coastal Housing Markets," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205664, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Jed Cohen & Christine E. Blinn & Kevin J. Boyle & Thomas P. Holmes & Klaus Moeltner, 2016. "Hedonic Valuation with Translating Amenities: Mountain Pine Beetles and Host Trees in the Colorado Front Range," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(3), pages 613-642, March.
    5. repec:eee:foreco:v:26:y:2017:i:c:p:46-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ludo Peeters & Eloi Schreurs & Steven Passel, 2017. "Heterogeneous Impact of Soil Contamination on Farmland Prices in the Belgian Campine Region: Evidence from Unconditional Quantile Regressions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 66(1), pages 135-168, January.
    7. Janne Artell & Anni Huhtala, 2017. "What Are the Benefits of the Water Framework Directive? Lessons Learned for Policy Design from Preference Revelation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 68(4), pages 847-873, December.

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