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Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in Cameroon -- Assessing costs and benefits

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  • Bellassen, Valentin
  • Gitz, Vincent

Abstract

A new momentum is underway to account for emissions from "avoided deforestation and degradation" at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This paper assesses the feasibility of one of the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanisms currently discussed, namely that of "Compensated Reduction", in the case of Cameroon. Here we assess the differential revenues that a farmer could get from 1Â ha of land out of two alternative land-uses: shifting cultivation, the traditional land-use pattern in southern Cameroon, or carbon credits as compensation for the conservation of primary forest. It is found that a break-even price of $2.85/t of carbon dioxide equivalent would level shifting cultivation with "Compensated Reduction". This result suggests that at current carbon prices, and independently form variations in the discount rate, it could already be more profitable to preserve the primary forest rather than to log it in order to grow crops.

Suggested Citation

  • Bellassen, Valentin & Gitz, Vincent, 2008. "Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in Cameroon -- Assessing costs and benefits," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 336-344, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2008:i:1-2:p:336-344
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth M. Chomitz & Franck Lecocq, 2004. "Temporary sequestration credits: an instrument for carbon bears," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 65-74, March.
    2. Sankhayan, Prem L. & Hofstad, Ole, 2001. "A village-level economic model of land clearing, grazing, and wood harvesting for sub-Saharan Africa: with a case study in southern Senegal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 423-440, September.
    3. Vincent Gitz & Philippe Ciais, 2004. "Future expansion of agriculture and pasture acts toamplify atmospheric CO2 levels in response to fossilfuel and land-use change emissions," Post-Print halshs-00009828, HAL.
    4. Tschakert, Petra, 2004. "The costs of soil carbon sequestration: an economic analysis for small-scale farming systems in Senegal," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 227-253, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Blake & M'Gonigle, Michael, 2012. "Does ecological economics have a future?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 37-48.
    2. Cacho, Oscar J. & Milne, Sarah & Gonzalez, Ricardo & Tacconi, Luca, 2014. "Benefits and costs of deforestation by smallholders: Implications for forest conservation and climate policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 321-332.
    3. Knoke, Thomas & Steinbeis, Otto-Emmanuel & Bösch, Matthias & Román-Cuesta, Rosa María & Burkhardt, Thomas, 2011. "Cost-effective compensation to avoid carbon emissions from forest loss: An approach to consider price-quantity effects and risk-aversion," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1139-1153, April.
    4. Acosta, Montserrat & Sohngen, Brent, 2009. "How big is leakage from forestry carbon credits? Estimates from a Global Model," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49468, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Patrick Bottazzi & David Crespo & Harry Soria & Hy Dao & Marcelo Serrudo & Jean Paul Benavides & Stefan Schwarzer & Stephan Rist, 2014. "Carbon Sequestration in Community Forests: Trade-offs, Multiple Outcomes and Institutional Diversity in the Bolivian Amazon," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 105-131, January.
    6. Meley M. Araya & Ole Hofstad, 2016. "Monetary incentives to avoid deforestation under the Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD)+ climate change mitigation scheme in Tanzania," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 421-443, March.
    7. Bottazzi, Patrick & Cattaneo, Andrea & Rocha, David Crespo & Rist, Stephan, 2013. "Assessing sustainable forest management under REDD+: A community-based labour perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 94-103.
    8. Mbatu, Richard S., 2015. "Domestic and international forest regime nexus in Cameroon: An assessment of the effectiveness of REDD+ policy design strategy in the context of the climate change regime," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 46-56.
    9. Heli Lu & Guifang Liu, 2015. "Opportunity Costs of Carbon Emissions Stemming from Changes in Land Use," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(4), pages 1-18, March.
    10. Yuki Yamamoto & Kenji Takeuchi, 2012. "Estimating the break-even price for forest protection in Central Kalimantan," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 14(3), pages 289-301, July.
    11. A.A. Yusuf & E.L. Roos & J.M. Horridge, 2017. "Indonesia's moratorium on palm oil expansion from natural forest: Economy-wide impact and the role of international transfers," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-276, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    12. Westholm, Lisa & Henders, Sabine & Ostwald, Madelene & Mattsson, Eskil, 2009. "Assessment of existing global financial initiatives and monitoring aspects of carbon sinks in forest ecosystems – The issue of REDD," Working Papers in Economics 373, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    13. Dang Phan, Thu-Ha & Brouwer, Roy & Davidson, Marc, 2014. "The economic costs of avoided deforestation in the developing world: A meta-analysis," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-16.
    14. Hofstad, Ole & Araya, Meley Mekonen, 2015. "Optimal wood harvest in miombo woodland considering REDD+payments — A case study at Kitulangalo Forest Reserve, Tanzania," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 9-16.
    15. Molua, Ernest L. & Thiombiano, Lamourdia & Fonteh, Mathias F. & Sagnia, Sankung & Nguinguiri, Jean Claude, 2015. "Sustainable Choices for a Comprehensive Agricultural Sector in the Congo Basin of Central Africa," Sustainable Agriculture Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 4(1).

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