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Maximum Economic Yield Fishery Management in the Face of Global Warming

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  • Diop, Bassirou
  • Sanz, Nicolas
  • Duplan, Yves Jamont Junior
  • Guene, El Hadji Mama
  • Blanchard, Fabian
  • Pereau, Jean-Christophe
  • Doyen, Luc

Abstract

This paper deals with fishery management in the face of the ecological and economic effects of global warming. To achieve this, a dynamic bioeconomic model and model-based scenarios are considered, in which the stock's growth function depends on the sea surface temperature. The model is empirically calibrated for the French Guiana shrimp fishery using time series collected over the period 1993–2009. Three fishing effort strategies are then compared under two contrasted IPCC climate scenarios (RCP 8.5 and RCP 2.6). A first harvesting strategy maintains the Status Quo in terms of fishing effort. A more ecologically-oriented strategy based on the closure of the fishery is also considered. A third strategy, which relates to Maximum Economic Yield (MEY), is based on the optimisation of the net present value derived from fishing. The results first show that ‘Status Quo’ fishing intensity combined with global warming leads to the collapse of the fishery in the long run. Secondly, it turns out that the Closure strategy preserves stock viability especially under the optimistic climate scenario. Thirdly, the MEY strategy makes it possible to satisfy bioeconomic performances requirements with positive stock and profit, once again, especially under the optimistic warming scenario. Consequently, MEY emerges as a relevant bioeconomic strategy in terms of adaptation to climate change but only in connection with climate change mitigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Diop, Bassirou & Sanz, Nicolas & Duplan, Yves Jamont Junior & Guene, El Hadji Mama & Blanchard, Fabian & Pereau, Jean-Christophe & Doyen, Luc, 2018. "Maximum Economic Yield Fishery Management in the Face of Global Warming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 52-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:154:y:2018:i:c:p:52-61
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2018.07.027
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Garza-Gil, 1998. "ITQ Systems in Multifleet Fisheries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(1), pages 79-92, January.
    2. Fabien Steinmetz & Olivier Thébaud & Fabian Blanchard & Pascal Le Floc'H & Julien Bihel, 2008. "A bio-economic analysis of long term changes in the production of French fishing fleets operating in the Bay of Biscay," Post-Print hal-00366687, HAL.
    3. Doyen, L. & Martinet, V., 2012. "Maximin, viability and sustainability," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1414-1430.
    4. Sanchirico, James N. & Smith, Martin D. & Lipton, Douglas W., 2008. "An empirical approach to ecosystem-based fishery management," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 586-596, January.
    5. Tom Kompas & Cathy M. Dichmont & André E. Punt & A. Deng & Tuong Nhu Che & Janet Bishop & Peter Gooday & Yemin Ye & S. Zhou, 2010. "Maximizing profits and conserving stocks in the Australian Northern Prawn Fishery," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(3), pages 281-299, July.
    6. Grafton, R. Quentin & Kompas, Tom & Chu, Long & Che, Nhu, 2010. "Maximum economic yield," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(3), pages 1-8.
    7. Christophe Béné & Luc Doyen, 2000. "Storage and Viability of a Fishery with Resource and Market Dephased Seasonalities," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 15(1), pages 1-26, January.
    8. Clark, Colin W. & Munro, Gordon R., 1975. "The economics of fishing and modern capital theory: A simplified approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 92-106, December.
    9. Nicolas Sanz & Bassirou Diop & Fabian Blanchard & Luis Lampert, 2017. "On the influence of environmental factors on harvest: the French Guiana shrimp fishery paradox," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(2), pages 233-247, April.
    10. Trond Bjørndal & Jon M. Conrad & Kjell G. Salvanes, 1993. "Stock Size, Harvesting Costs, and the Potential for Extinction: The Case of Sealing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 69(2), pages 156-167.
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    1. repec:eee:ecomod:v:387:y:2018:i:c:p:27-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Diop, Bassirou & Blanchard, Fabian & Sanz, Nicolas, 2018. "Mangrove increases resiliency of the French Guiana shrimp fishery facing global warming," Ecological Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 387(C), pages 27-37.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable resources; Fishery bioeconomic model; Climate change; Climate scenarios; Adaptation; Shrimp;

    JEL classification:

    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery

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