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Stock Size, Harvesting Costs, and the Potential for Extinction: The Case of Sealing

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  • Trond Bjørndal
  • Jon M. Conrad
  • Kjell G. Salvanes

Abstract

Starting in the 1960s, considerable opposition to the Canadian and Norwegian harp seal hunt off Newfoundland developed. It was alleged that the seal hunt was unethical and that the seal population had been seriously depleted. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the production function for the seal hunt based on data for the Norwegian seal hunt. Particular attention is paid to the question whether free entry to the fishery will cause overexploitation. This depends critically on the characteristics of the production function, in particular the extent to which harvesting costs depend on stock size.

Suggested Citation

  • Trond Bjørndal & Jon M. Conrad & Kjell G. Salvanes, 1993. "Stock Size, Harvesting Costs, and the Potential for Extinction: The Case of Sealing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 69(2), pages 156-167.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:69:y:1993:i:2:p:156-167
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    Cited by:

    1. Dawid, Herbert & Kopel, Michael, 1997. "On the Economically Optimal Exploitation of a Renewable Resource: The Case of a Convex Environment and a Convex Return Function," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 272-297, October.
    2. Maroto, Jose M. & Moran, Manuel, 2008. "Increasing marginal returns and the danger of collapse of commercially valuable fish stocks," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 422-428, December.
    3. Liski, Matti & Kort, Peter M. & Novak, Andreas, 2001. "Increasing returns and cycles in fishing," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 241-258, July.
    4. Julio Peña Torres & Claudio Agostini & Sebastián Vergara, 2005. "'El Niño' Effects and Biomass Endogeneity in a Harvest Function: The Chilean Jack Mackerel Fishery," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv160, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    5. M. Garza-Gil, 1998. "ITQ Systems in Multifleet Fisheries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 79-92.
    6. Nicolas Sanz & Bassirou Diop, 2015. "A search-matching model of fisheries," Working Papers hal-01228851, HAL.
    7. Birgit Bednar–Friedl & Karl Farmer, 2014. "Existence and efficiency of stationary states in a renewable resource based OLG model with different harvest costs," Graz Economics Papers 2014-07, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    8. Nicolas Sanz & Bassirou Diop & Fabian Blanchard & Luis Lampert, 2017. "On the influence of environmental factors on harvest: the French Guiana shrimp fishery paradox," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(2), pages 233-247, April.
    9. Stan Metcalfe, 2014. "George Shackle and The Schumpeterian Legacy," Graz Economics Papers 2014-08, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    10. Asche, Frank & Smith, Martin D., 2010. "Trade and fisheries: Key issues for the World Trade Organization," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2010-03, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    11. Reinoud Joosten, 2016. "Strong and Weak Rarity Value: Resource Games with Complex Price–Scarcity Relationships," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 97-111, March.

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