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The Complex Relationship Between Households' Climate Change Concerns and Their Water and Energy Mitigation Behaviour

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  • Nauges, Céline
  • Wheeler, Sarah Ann

Abstract

This study analyses household survey data on water and energy climate change mitigation behaviour from eleven OECD countries, and provides new evidence of a complex relationship between climate change concerns and mitigation behaviour. Results confirm other studies that climate change concerns positively influence specific mitigation actions. However we also find evidence that this relationship may be more complex in the sense that adoption of mitigation behaviour may negatively feedback on households' climate change concerns. This effect more likely occurs in ‘environmentally-motivated’ households. Conversely, economic incentives in driving energy and water mitigation work better in non-environmentally-motivated households. This highlights that a portfolio of policies is needed to drive mitigation behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Nauges, Céline & Wheeler, Sarah Ann, 2017. "The Complex Relationship Between Households' Climate Change Concerns and Their Water and Energy Mitigation Behaviour," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 87-94.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:87-94
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.05.026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Thøgersen, John & Noblet, Caroline, 2012. "Does green consumerism increase the acceptance of wind power?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 854-862.
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    5. Ohler, Adrienne M. & Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2014. "Does environmental concern change the tragedy of the commons? Factors affecting energy saving behaviors and electricity usage," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 1-12.
    6. Christophe Bontemps & Céline Nauges, 2016. "The Impact of Perceptions in Averting-decision Models: An Application of the Special Regressor Method to Drinking Water Choices," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(1), pages 297-313.
    7. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Boto-Garcìa & Alessandro Bucciol, 2019. "Climate Change: Personal Responsibility and Energy Saving," Working Papers 02/2019, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    2. repec:eee:ecolec:v:154:y:2018:i:c:p:383-393 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin & Alhusen, Harm, 2018. "On the determinants of pro-environmental behavior: A guide for further investigations," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 350, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Binder, Martin & Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin & Guardiola, Jorge, 2019. "Does it have to be a sacrifice? Different notions of the good life, pro-environmental behavior and their heterogeneous impact on well-being," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 366, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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