IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolec/v13y1995i2p99-114.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Information, order and knowledge in economic and ecological systems: implications for material and energy use

Author

Listed:
  • Ruth, Matthias

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruth, Matthias, 1995. "Information, order and knowledge in economic and ecological systems: implications for material and energy use," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 99-114, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:13:y:1995:i:2:p:99-114
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0921-8009(94)00064-3
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hannon, Bruce & Ruth, Matthias & Delucia, Evan, 1993. "A physical view of sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 253-268, December.
    2. Ruth, Matthias & Bullard, Clark W., 1993. "Information, production and utility," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(10), pages 1059-1067, October.
    3. Ahrendts, Joachim, 1980. "Reference states," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 5(8), pages 666-677.
    4. Ayres, Robert U., 1988. "Optimal investment policies with exhaustible resources: An information-based model," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 439-461, December.
    5. Matthias Ruth, 1995. "Thermodynamic implications for natural resource extraction and technical change in U.S. copper mining," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(2), pages 187-206, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Stern, David I., 2010. "The Role of Energy in Economic Growth," Working Papers 249380, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    2. Fizaine, Florian & Court, Victor, 2015. "Renewable electricity producing technologies and metal depletion: A sensitivity analysis using the EROI," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 106-118.
    3. David I. Stern & Cutler J. Cleveland, 2004. "Energy and Economic Growth," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0410, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
    4. Michael Huesemann & Joyce Huesemann, 2008. "Will progress in science and technology avert or accelerate global collapse? A critical analysis and policy recommendations," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 10(6), pages 787-825, December.
    5. Ruth, Matthias, 1995. "Technology change in US iron and steel production : Implications for material and energy use, and CO2 emissions," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 199-214, September.
    6. Cleveland, Cutler J. & Ruth, Matthias, 1997. "When, where, and by how much do biophysical limits constrain the economic process?: A survey of Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen's contribution to ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 203-223, September.
    7. Stern, David I., 1997. "Limits to substitution and irreversibility in production and consumption: A neoclassical interpretation of ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 197-215, June.
    8. Balocco, C. & Grazzini, G., 2006. "Sustainability and information in urban system analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 2905-2914, November.
    9. Angelina De Pascale, 2012. "Role of Entropy in Sustainable Economic Growth," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 2(Special 1), pages 293-301, May.
    10. Weston, Roy F. & Ruth, Matthias, 1997. "A dynamic, hierarchical approach to understanding and managing natural economic systems," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-17, April.
    11. Victor Court & Florian Fizaine, 2014. "Energy transition towards renewables and metal depletion: an approach through the EROI concept," Post-Print hal-01411803, HAL.
    12. Buenstorf, Guido, 2000. "Self-organization and sustainability: energetics of evolution and implications for ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 119-134, April.
    13. Matthias Ruth, 1995. "Thermodynamic implications for natural resource extraction and technical change in U.S. copper mining," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(2), pages 187-206, September.
    14. Stern, David I., 1999. "Is energy cost an accurate indicator of natural resource quality?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 381-394, December.
    15. Ruth, Matthias, 1995. "Thermodynamic constraints on optimal depletion of copper and aluminum in the United States: a dynamic model of substitution and technical change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 197-213, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:13:y:1995:i:2:p:99-114. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.