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Fiscal institutions and public spending volatility in Europe

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  • Albuquerque, Bruno

Abstract

This work provides empirical evidence for a sizeable, statistically significant negative impact of the quality of fiscal institutions on public spending volatility for a panel of 23 EU countries over the 1980–2007 period. The dependent variable is the volatility of discretionary fiscal policy, which does not represent reactions to changes in economic conditions. Our baseline results thus give support to the strengthening of institutions to deal with excessive levels of discretion volatility, as more checks and balances make it harder for governments to change fiscal policy for reasons unrelated to the current state of the economy. Our results also show that bigger countries and bigger governments have less public spending volatility. In contrast to previous studies, the political factors do not seem to play a role, with the exception of the Herfindahl index, which suggests that a high concentration of parliamentary seats in a few parties would increase public spending volatility.

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  • Albuquerque, Bruno, 2011. "Fiscal institutions and public spending volatility in Europe," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2544-2559.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:6:p:2544-2559
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2011.07.018
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    Cited by:

    1. Aygun Garayeva & Gulzar Tahirova, 2017. "Government Spending Effectiveness and the Quality of Fiscal Institutions," Izvestiya, Varna University of Economics, issue 2, pages 128-143.
    2. Ademmer, Esther & Dreher, Ferdinand, 2014. "Institutional constraints to political budget cycles in the enlarged EU," Kiel Working Papers 1964, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Ernesto Crivelli, 2016. "Trade liberalization and tax revenue in transition: an empirical analysis of the replacement strategy," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 6(1), pages 1-25, April.
    4. Agnese Sacchi & Simone Salotti, 2017. "The influence of decentralized taxes and intergovernmental grants on local spending volatility," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(4), pages 507-522, April.
    5. Bruno Albuquerque, 2012. "Fiscal institutions and public spending volatility in Europe," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    6. COMANICIU Carmen, 2015. "Some Coordinates Regarding The Romanian Taxpayers Behavior," Revista Economica, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 67(1), pages 32-44, February.
    7. Naotaka Sugawara, 2014. "From Volatility to Stability in Expenditure; Stabilization Funds in Resource-Rich Countries," IMF Working Papers 14/43, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Crivelli, Ernesto, 2013. "Fiscal impact of privatization revisited: The role of tax revenues in transition economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 217-232.
    9. Yuan-Hong Ho & Chiung-Ju Huang, 2013. "Presidential Election, Checks and Balances, and Allocation of Public Expenditures in Taiwan," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 9(1), pages 31-53, January.
    10. Carmen, COMANICIU, 2014. "Studying Taxation - Necessity And Opportunity," Management Strategies Journal, Constantin Brancoveanu University, vol. 26(4), pages 204-211.
    11. Bergman, U. Michael & Hutchison, Michael M. & Jensen, Svend E. Hougaard, 2016. "Promoting sustainable public finances in the European Union: The role of fiscal rules and government efficiency," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-19.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; Policy volatility; Fiscal rules; Fiscal institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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