IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecmode/v28y2011i4p1902-1906.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Capital mobility, skill formation and polarization

Author

Listed:
  • Beladi, Hamid
  • Marjit, Sugata
  • Broll, Udo

Abstract

We bring in hierarchical education and skill formation within a standard Jonesian specific-factor model of production and trade for a developing economy. There are three types of labor, unskilled, medium skilled and high-skilled. The unskilled can only develop into medium-skilled and medium-skilled into high-skilled. As capital becomes internationally mobile, educational capital gets concentrated in particular types of education. In the process the society gets polarized between the highly educated and the absolutely uneducated.

Suggested Citation

  • Beladi, Hamid & Marjit, Sugata & Broll, Udo, 2011. "Capital mobility, skill formation and polarization," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1902-1906, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:4:p:1902-1906
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264999311000861
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Das, Mausumi, 2007. "Persistent inequality: An explanation based on limited parental altruism," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 251-270, September.
    2. Findlay, Ronald & Kierzkowski, Henryk, 1983. "International Trade and Human Capital: A Simple General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(6), pages 957-978, December.
    3. Ronald Findlay, 1995. "Factor Proportions, Trade, and Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061759, January.
    4. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    5. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Newman, Andrew F, 1993. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 274-298, April.
    6. Deardorff, Alan V., 2005. "Ricardian comparative advantage with intermediate inputs," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 11-34, March.
    7. Chau, Nancy H & Stark, Oded, 1999. "Migration under Asymmetric Information and Human Capital Formation," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 455-483, August.
    8. Sugata Marjit & Hamid Beladi, 2009. "International And Intra-National Trade: A Continuum Approach," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 60(3), pages 320-332.
    9. Reza Oladi, 2004. "Strategic quotas on foreign investment and migration," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 24(2), pages 289-306, August.
    10. Bond, Eric, 2005. "Market linkages with fragmented production," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 119-135, March.
    11. Kar, Saibal & Beladi, Hamid, 2004. "Skill formation and international migration: welfare perspective of developing countries," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 35-54, January.
    12. Gilbert, John & Oladi, Reza, 2009. "Capital specificity, imperfect labor mobility and growth in developing economies," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 113-122, January.
    13. Marjit, Sugata & Kar, Saibal, 2005. "Emigration and wage inequality," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 141-145, July.
    14. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Dynamic evolution of income distribution and credit-constrained human capital investment in open economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 329-358, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pi, Jiancai & Zhou, Yu, 2014. "Foreign capital, public infrastructure, and wage inequality in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 195-207.
    2. Pan, Lijun, 2014. "The impacts of education investment on skilled–unskilled wage inequality and economic development in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 174-181.
    3. Mandal, Biswajit & Marjit, Sugata & Nakanishi, Noritsugu, 2013. "Time Zones, Factor Prices and Inflow of Educational Capital: Changing Sectoral Composition," MPRA Paper 50883, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Pi, Jiancai & Zhang, Pengqing, 2017. "Foreign capital, pollution control, and wage inequality in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 280-288.
    5. Pan, Lijun & Zhou, Yu, 2013. "International factor mobility, environmental pollution and skilled–unskilled wage inequality in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 826-831.
    6. Mandal, Biswajit & Marjit, Sugata & Nakanishi, Noritsugu, 2015. "Outsourcing, Factor Prices and Skill Formation in Countries with Non-overlapping Time Zones," MPRA Paper 68227, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:4:p:1902-1906. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.