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Educational loan and human capital accumulation in a small open economy

Author

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  • Megumi Mochida

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

Cartiglia (1997) shows that trade increases human capital investment in developing countries unless there are credit markets for individuals. In this paper, when households can borrow the education cost from a market, a trade-induced decrease in the skilled wage leads to less human capital investment in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Megumi Mochida, 2004. "Educational loan and human capital accumulation in a small open economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(16), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04f40005
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eicher, Theo S., 1999. "Trade, development and converging growth rates: Dynamic gains from trade reconsidered," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 179-198, June.
    2. Mino, Kazuo, 1996. "Analysis of a Two-Sector Model of Endogenous Growth with Capital Income Taxation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(1), pages 227-251, February.
    3. Findlay, Ronald & Kierzkowski, Henryk, 1983. "International Trade and Human Capital: A Simple General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(6), pages 957-978, December.
    4. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    5. Galor, Oded & Zang, Hyoungsoo, 1997. "Fertility, income distribution, and economic growth: Theory and cross-country evidence," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 197-229, May.
    6. Ziderman, Adrian, 2002. "Financing student loans in Thailand: revolving fund or open-ended commitment?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 367-380, August.
    7. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Dynamic evolution of income distribution and credit-constrained human capital investment in open economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 329-358, December.
    8. Nancy L. Stokey, 1991. "The Volume and Composition of Trade Between Rich and Poor Countries," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 63-80.
    9. Besley, Timothy, 1995. "Savings, credit and insurance," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 36, pages 2123-2207 Elsevier.
    10. Cartiglia, Filippo, 1997. "Credit constraints and human capital accumulation in the open economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1-2), pages 221-236, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capital market imperfection;

    JEL classification:

    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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