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Development of domestic markets and poverty reduction for poor developing economies

  • Chyi, Yih-Luan
  • Hwang, Chun-Sin
Registered author(s):

    Constructing a model of structural change with household production, this paper finds two equilibrium paths: one path leads to a low-income steady state and the other to a high-income steady state. This paper shows that as long as the relative marginal productivity of manufactured goods in household production is high enough, a poor country may transform from a home-producing economy to a firm-producing one and eventually reaches a high standard of living. Is it empirically acceptable for us to claim that when a country starts with poorer pro-market infrastructures and institutions, she will be less likely to escape from poverty later on? This paper provides an empirical evidence of positive relationship between pro-market infrastructures and poverty reduction for poor developing countries.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB1-512DT1V-3/2/37ecaf575b5d088f3177815a1fb08466
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1-2 (January)
    Pages: 374-381

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:1-2:p:374-381
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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