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Implicit contracts and the cyclicality of the skill-premium

  • Pourpourides, Panayiotis M.

To examine the cyclical behavior of the skill-premium, this paper introduces implicit labor contracts in a DSGE model where production is characterized by capital-skill complementarity and the utilization of capital is endogenous. It is shown that this model can reproduce the observed cyclical patterns of wages and the skill-premium. The feature of capital-skill complementarity coupled with variable capital utilization rates does not come at odds with the acyclical behavior of the skill-premium. The paper argues that the skill-complementarity of capital is not a quantitatively significant factor at high frequencies. The key aspects are the contracts and the capital utilization margin.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 35 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (June)
Pages: 963-979

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:35:y:2011:i:6:p:963-979
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

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