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Local trade networks and spatially persistent unemployment

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  • Oomes, Nienke

Abstract

This paper studies the effect of local trade networks on the spatial distribution of employment in a Cooper and John (1988) type model with effective demand externalities. It is shown that, if labor can be hired in continuous quantities, then the long run spatial distribution of employment is uniform, and independent of any trade network topology. When labor has binary support, however, local trade networks are shown to generate spatial unemployment clusters which can persist indefinitely.
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Suggested Citation

  • Oomes, Nienke, 2003. "Local trade networks and spatially persistent unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(11-12), pages 2115-2149, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:27:y:2003:i:11-12:p:2115-2149
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    Cited by:

    1. Jianjun Lu & Shozo Tokinaga, 2016. "Cluster fluctuation in two-dimensional lattices with local interactions," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 237-259, June.
    2. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    3. Meissner, Christopher M. & Oomes, Nienke, 2009. "Why do countries peg the way they peg? The determinants of anchor currency choice," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 522-547, April.
    4. Brock,W.A. & Durlauf,S.N., 2005. "Social interactions and macroeconomics," Working papers 5, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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