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Growth or stagnation? The role of public education

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  • Beauchemin, Kenneth R.

Abstract

This paper presents a political-economic theory of growth and human capital accumulation. Age heterogeneity is put forth as the primary source of disagreement between individuals over various levels public education expenditures. An overlapping generations model with with two-period lived agents is constructed to capture the heterogeneity. With a growing population, the equilibrium quantity of public education reflects the preferences of youth and is therefore foward looking. As such, policy preferences are a function of intertemporal elasticities, utility discounting and population growth. Despite foward looking behavior, it is shown that sufficiently rapid population growth can trigger stagnation (zero growth) in the form of a corner solution to the public policy problem. The model therefore complements existing models that associate slow per capita output growth with high population growth.
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  • Beauchemin, Kenneth R., 2001. "Growth or stagnation? The role of public education," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 389-416, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:64:y:2001:i:2:p:389-416
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Flaschel & Alfred Greiner, 2011. "A Future for Capitalism," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14241, June.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2012. "Infrastructure, Public Education And Growth With Congestion Costs," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 449-469, October.
    3. Yanagihara, Mitsuyoshi & Lu, Chen, 2013. "Cash-in-advance constraint, optimal monetary policy, and human capital accumulation," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 278-288.
    4. Juntip Boonprakaikawe & Frédéric Tournemaine, 2014. "On the Macroeconomic Impact of a Regional Development Policy with Endogenous Residential Choice," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 75-100, Spring.
    5. Alfred Greiner & Peter Flaschel, 2009. "Economic Policy in a Growth Model with Human Capital, Heterogenous Agents and Unemployment," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 175-192, March.
    6. Andrea Doneschi & Rossana Patron, 2011. "Assessing incentives and risks in training decisions. A methodological note applied to the Uruguayan case," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1511, Department of Economics - dECON.
    7. Greiner, Alfred, 2008. "Fiscal policy in an endogenous growth model with human capital and heterogenous agents," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 643-657, July.
    8. Greiner, Alfred, 2008. "Human capital formation, public debt and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 415-427, March.
    9. Leonid Azarnert, 2006. "Free Education: For Whom, Where and When?," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_024, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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