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Fiscal policy in an endogenous growth model with human capital and heterogenous agents

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  • Greiner, Alfred

Abstract

This paper studies effects of fiscal policy in an endogenous growth model with human capital and heterogenous agents. Two types of households are considered. One household acquires human capital or skills through education while the other household remains unskilled. Sustained growth is the result of human capital accumulation which is a function of the existing human capital employed in the educational sector and of public spending for education. Aggregate production is given by a function with physical capital and labor as input factors, where total labor input is modelled by a CES function with skilled and unskilled labor as arguments. The paper studies effects of fiscal policy as concerns long-run growth and the distribution of income as well as concerns welfare of the two households.

Suggested Citation

  • Greiner, Alfred, 2008. "Fiscal policy in an endogenous growth model with human capital and heterogenous agents," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 643-657, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:25:y:2008:i:4:p:643-657
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    2. Giancarlo Corsetti & Nouriel Roubini, 1996. "Optimal Government Spending and Taxation in Endgenous Growth Models," NBER Working Papers 5851, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Futagami, Koichi & Morita, Yuichi & Shibata, Akihisa, 1993. " Dynamic Analysis of an Endogenous Growth Model with Public Capital," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(4), pages 607-625, December.
    4. Beauchemin, Kenneth R., 2001. "Growth or stagnation? The role of public education," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 389-416, April.
    5. Ni, Shawn & Wang, Xinghe, 1994. "Human capital and income taxation in an endogenous growth model," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 493-507.
    6. Blankenau, William F. & Simpson, Nicole B., 2004. "Public education expenditures and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 583-605, April.
    7. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rao, B. Bhaskara, 2010. "Estimates of the steady state growth rates for selected Asian countries with an extended Solow model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 46-53, January.
    2. Christoph Priesmeier & Nikolai Stähler, 2011. "Long Dark Shadows Or Innovative Spirits? The Effects Of (Smoothing) Business Cycles On Economic Growth: A Survey Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 898-912, December.
    3. Annabi, Nabil & Harvey, Simon & Lan, Yu, 2011. "Public expenditures on education, human capital and growth in Canada: An OLG model analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 852-865.
    4. Tournemaine, Frederic & Tsoukis, Christopher, 2015. "The growth–distribution nexus in a mixed regime of education with a status motive: On the macroeconomics of the welfare state," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 235-243.

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