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Extracurricular activities in school, do they matter?

  • Shulruf, Boaz
  • Tumen, Sarah
  • Tolley, Hilary
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    There is a large body of the literature which suggests that extracurricular activities (ECA) in schools have positive effects on student achievement; however, the majority of the research measured associations rather than causal effects. This study presents a robust methodological approach to determine whether student participation in extracurricular activities might have causal effect on academic outcomes and attitudes towards Literacy and Numeracy during secondary schooling. The results of this particular study could not provide conclusive evidence for causal effect of ECA on student performance. Nonetheless, the methodology presented in the paper does provide an effective research framework for measuring causal effects of a range of school based interventions and activities on student achievements and attitudes.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V98-4R295X9-1/1/6616e45e988d0a22ec40d07a3402eb0a
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 4 (April)
    Pages: 418-426

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:30:y:2008:i:4:p:418-426
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

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    1. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg, 2004. "Family Income and Educational Attainment: A Review of Approaches and Evidence for Britain," CEE Discussion Papers 0041, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    2. Stephen Machin, 2006. "Social Disadvantage and Education Experiences," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 32, OECD Publishing.
    3. Cook, Michael D & Evans, William N, 2000. "Families or Schools? Explaining the Convergence in White and Black Academic Performance," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(4), pages 729-54, October.
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