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Antecedents of materialism and compulsive buying: A life course study in Australia

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  • Weaver, S. Todd
  • Moschis, George P.
  • Davis, Teresa

Abstract

Compulsive buying and materialism have become topics of increasing interest to researchers and policy makers, particularly because studies have shown that both can influence consumer behavior and well-being. However, a clear picture of how these phenomena arise has proven elusive. Using the life course paradigm as an integrative framework, the present research derives hypotheses from three theoretical perspectives (the stress, normative, and human capital perspectives), and uses a survey of young adults in Australia to test the hypotheses. The findings indicate that one’s experiences and circumstances in adolescence are related to both materialism and compulsive buying in early adulthood, but the processes involved in their development differ. These differences, as well as the framework used to elucidate them, have important implications for theory and practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Weaver, S. Todd & Moschis, George P. & Davis, Teresa, 2011. "Antecedents of materialism and compulsive buying: A life course study in Australia," Australasian marketing journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 247-256.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:aumajo:v:19:y:2011:i:4:p:247-256
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ausmj.2011.04.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. János Debreceni, 0. "Tangible or Intangible Ways to Happiness? Consumption Related Values Among Adolescents," European Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies Articles, European Center for Science Education and Research, vol. 3, EJMS Sept.
    2. Helen Duh & Sarah Benmoyal-Bouzaglo & George Moschis & Lilia Smaoui, 2015. "Examination of Young Adults’ Materialism in France and South Africa Using Two Life-Course Theoretical Perspectives," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 251-262, June.

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