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The contribution of carbon-based payments to wetland conservation compensation on agricultural landscapes

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  • Neuman, Amber D.
  • Belcher, Ken W.

Abstract

This paper evaluates the potential of payments for carbon sequestered through wetland and riparian conservation, to offset the costs of publicly funded wetland conservation programs. In particular, the research focuses on quantifying the value of carbon sequestered in wetland and riparian zones of the Prairie Pothole Region in the province of Saskatchewan. The analysis examines a number of different program design, targeting alternatives and carbon prices and finds that payments for carbon contribute up to 3% (at $5Â t-1Â CO2e) and up to 9% (at $15Â t-1Â CO2e) of the monetary costs to compensate farmers for adopting wetland and riparian conservation management.

Suggested Citation

  • Neuman, Amber D. & Belcher, Ken W., 2011. "The contribution of carbon-based payments to wetland conservation compensation on agricultural landscapes," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 75-81, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:104:y:2011:i:1:p:75-81
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adger, W. Neil & Luttrell, Cecilia, 2000. "Property rights and the utilisation of wetlands," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 75-89, October.
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    3. Hongli Feng & Catherine L. Kling, 2005. "The Consequences of Cobenefits for the Efficient Design of Carbon Sequestration Programs," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 53(4), pages 461-476, December.
    4. Daniel J. Phaneuf & V. Kerry Smith & Raymond B. Palmquist & Jaren C. Pope, 2008. "Integrating Property Value and Local Recreation Models to Value Ecosystem Services in Urban Watersheds," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(3), pages 361-381.
    5. John A. Fox & Jeffrey M. Peterson, 2008. "Farmers' Perceived Costs of Wetlands: Effects of Wetland Size, Hydration, and Dispersion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(1), pages 172-185.
    6. Hansen, LeRoy T., 2009. "The Viability of Creating Wetlands for the Sale of Carbon Offsets," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 1-16, August.
    7. Claassen, Roger & Hansen, LeRoy T. & Peters, Mark & Breneman, Vincent E. & Weinberg, Marca & Cattaneo, Andrea & Feather, Peter & Gadsby, Dwight M. & Hellerstein, Daniel & Hopkins, Jeffrey W. & Johnsto, 2001. "Agri-Environmental Policy at the Crossroads: Guideposts on a Changing Landscape," Agricultural Economic Reports 33983, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anton Sizo & Bram Noble & Scott Bell, 2015. "Futures Analysis of Urban Land Use and Wetland Change in Saskatoon, Canada: An Application in Strategic Environmental Assessment," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(1), pages 1-20, January.

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