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Determinants of Microfinance institutions' access to bank credit in Senegal

Author

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  • François Seck Fall

    () (Lereps (University of Toulouse), CRES (University of Dakar))

Abstract

The financial relationship between banks and microfinance institutions (MFIs) is a key element of the debate on establishing accessible financial systems in sub-Saharan countries. Today, MFIs face strong and growing pressure in terms of resources, especially due to an increasing demand for funding, both in number and volumes. However, there is virtually no academic literature on refinancing between banks and MFIs. Also, the existing empirical literature on microfinance access to external funding has to some extend neglected the importance of bank financing funds, focusing more on international external funds. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the access of MFIs to external funds from the local banking system. Specifically, we examine the link between an MFI's access to Banks funding and its maturity and performance. From a panel of 156 Senegalese MFIs, we have created a fixed-effects model to help explain the influence of key variables (MFI size, profitability, risk, etc.) on an MFI's ability to raise funds from the local banking system. The results show that bank financing generally benefit large MFIs, those with significant tangible assets and with a high quality portfolio. Profitability does not seem to be a key determinant of MFI's access to bank funding. However, the funds deposited by microfinance organizations in banks act as a financing guarantee and strongly help MFIs to raise funds from local commercial banks.

Suggested Citation

  • François Seck Fall, 2017. "Determinants of Microfinance institutions' access to bank credit in Senegal," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(2), pages 1327-1338.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-16-00828
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mersland, Roy & Randøy, Trond & Strøm, Reidar Øystein, 2011. "The impact of international influence on microbanks' performance: A global survey," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 163-176, April.
    2. Marie Briere & Ariane Szafarz, 2015. "Does commercial microfinance belong to the financial sector? Lessons from the stock market," Post-Print CEB, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 67, pages 110-125, March.
    3. Valentina Hartarska & Denis Nadolnyak, 2007. "Do regulated microfinance institutions achieve better sustainability and outreach? Cross-country evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(10), pages 1207-1222.
    4. Laurence Booth, 2001. "Capital Structures in Developing Countries," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 87-130, February.
    5. Hermes, Niels & Lensink, Robert & Meesters, Aljar, 2011. "Outreach and Efficiency of Microfinance Institutions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 938-948, June.
    6. Beck, Thorsten & Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 2008. "Financing patterns around the world: Are small firms different?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(3), pages 467-487, September.
    7. Carpio, Gerard & Honohan, Patrick, 1993. "Excess liquidity and monetary overhangs," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 523-533, April.
    8. Hartarska, Valentina & Nadolnyak, Denis, 2008. "Does rating help microfinance institutions raise funds? Cross-country evidence," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 558-571, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking; Microfinance; Refinancing; Financial Cooperation; Panel model; Senegal.;

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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