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Investigating informal learning at a cultural site

Author

Listed:
  • Juan Gabriel Brida

    () (Free University of Bolzano)

  • Marta Meleddu

    () (University of Sassari & CRENoS)

  • Manuela Pulina

    () (University of Sassari & CRENoS)

  • Vania Statzu

    () (University of Cagliari & Crenos)

Abstract

Based on a microeconomic theory framework, this paper explores in what extent the visit to a museum influences visitors' informal learning. Empirically, a Heckman selection model has been employed that allows one to draw causal inferences in the observational setting. Survey data were collected at the South Tyrol's Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano (Italy) in 2011. More than half of the sample declared they had the opportunity to learn. The empirical specification reveals that pull factors have a positive effect on the propensity to learn new things. However, completing a previous visit does not increase the probability to learn more; the propensity to learn is also reduced when experiencing a negative feeling such as boredom and a sense of wasting time. These findings provide a useful policy tool to plan educational activities in the museum contributing to improve visitors' human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Gabriel Brida & Marta Meleddu & Manuela Pulina & Vania Statzu, 2014. "Investigating informal learning at a cultural site," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 634-650.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-13-00732
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andries de Grip & Wendy Smits, 2012. "What affects lifelong learning of scientists and engineers?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(5), pages 583-597, August.
    2. Blanden, Jo & Buscha, Franz & Sturgis, Patrick & Urwin, Peter, 2012. "Measuring the earnings returns to lifelong learning in the UK," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 501-514.
    3. Rodolfo Hoffmann & Ana Lucia Kassouf, 2005. "Deriving conditional and unconditional marginal effects in log earnings equations estimated by Heckman's procedure," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(11), pages 1303-1311.
    4. Elina Lampi & Matilda Orth, 2009. "Who Visits the Museums? A Comparison between Stated Preferences and Observed Effects of Entrance Fees," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(1), pages 85-102, February.
    5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Heckman selection model; Informal learning; museum; human capital.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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