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Econometric Fellows and Nobel Laureates in Economics

Author

Listed:
  • Ho Fai Chan

    () (School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology)

  • Benno Torgler

    () (Queensland University of Technology, CREMA (Switzerland), EBS Business School (Germany))

Abstract

An academic award is method by which peers offer recognition of intellectual efforts. In this paper we take a purely descriptive look at the relationship between becoming a Fellow of the Econometric Society and receiving the Nobel Prize in economics. We discover some interesting aspects: of all 69 Nobel Prize Laureates between 1969 and 2011, only 9 of them were not also Fellows. Moreover, the proportion of future Nobel winners among the Fellows has been quite high throughout time and a large share of researchers who became Fellows between the 1930s and 1950s became Nobel Laureates at a later stage. On average, researchers become Fellows relatively early in their career (14.9 years after their PhD) and those who were subsequently made Nobel Laureates become Fellows earlier than other researchers. Interestingly, Harvard and MIT have been the dominant PhD granting institutions to generate Fellows and Nobel Laureates in the past.

Suggested Citation

  • Ho Fai Chan & Benno Torgler, 2012. "Econometric Fellows and Nobel Laureates in Economics," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3365-3377.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00804
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I4-P324.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Torgler, Benno & Piatti, Marco, 2011. "A Century of American Economic Review," Berkeley Olin Program in Law & Economics, Working Paper Series qt6h59v4m6, Berkeley Olin Program in Law & Economics.
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Susanne Neckermann, 2008. "Awards in Economics - Towards a New Field of Inquiry," CREMA Working Paper Series 2008-33, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Robert J. Gordon, 1997. "What is the Econometric Society? History, Organization, and Basic Procedures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(6), pages 1443-1452, November.
    4. Bruno S. Frey & Susanne Neckermann, 2008. "Academics Appreciate Awards. A New Aspect of Incentives in Research," CREMA Working Paper Series 2008-32, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:scient:v:114:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2614-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ho Fai Chan & Bruno S. Frey & Jana Gallus & Markus Schaffner & Benno Torgler & Stephen Whyte, 2016. "External Influence as an Indicator of Scholarly Importance," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 62(1), pages 170-195.
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:112:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2429-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chan, Ho Fai & Frey, Bruno S. & Gallus, Jana & Torgler, Benno, 2014. "Academic honors and performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 188-204.
    5. Richard S.J. Tol, 2018. "Rise of the Kniesians: The professor-student network of Nobel laureates in economics," Working Paper Series 0518, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    6. Elisabeth Maria Schlagberger & Lutz Bornmann & Johann Bauer, 2016. "At what institutions did Nobel laureates do their prize-winning work? An analysis of biographical information on Nobel laureates from 1994 to 2014," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(2), pages 723-767, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fellows of the Econometric Society; Nobel Laureate; economics of science; awards;

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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