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The Effects of Building Energy Codes in Rental Housing: The German Experience

  • Claus Michelsen

    ()

    (Halle Institute for Economic Research)

  • Sebastian Rosenschon

    ()

    (Halle Institute for Economic Research)

This paper investigates the effect of building energy codes on housings' real energy consumption. We argue that building codes should have a twofold effect: lower levels of energy consumption after its implementation and decreasing energy requirements over time, because tighter building codes induce technical progress in the construction sector. We find evidence for both aspects. Based on a large and unique sample of energy certificates from Germany, this study is the first that deals with the empirical effects of energy efficiency standards in apartment/rental housing. Moreover, it is the first, which includes different stages of regulation.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I4-P336.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 3488-3502

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00790
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  1. Adam B. Jaffe & Karen Palmer, 1996. "Environmental Regulation and Innovation: A Panel Data Study," NBER Working Papers 5545, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Brounen, Dirk & Kok, Nils, 2011. "On the economics of energy labels in the housing market," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 166-179, September.
  3. Claus Michelsen & S. Müller-Michelsen, 2010. "Energieeffizienz im Altbau: Werden die Sanierungspotenziale überschätzt? Ergebnisse auf Grundlage des ista-IWH-Energieeffizienzindex," Wirtschaft im Wandel, Halle Institute for Economic Research, vol. 16(9), pages 447-455.
  4. Claus Michelsen, 2009. "Energieeffiziente Wohnimmobilien stehen im Osten und Süden der Republik: Ergebnisse des ista-IWH-Energieeffizienzindex," Wirtschaft im Wandel, Halle Institute for Economic Research, vol. 15(9), pages 380-388.
  5. DiPasquale, Denise, 1999. "Why Don't We Know More about Housing Supply?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 9-23, January.
  6. Brounen, Dirk & Kok, Nils & Quigley, John M., 2012. "Residential energy use and conservation: Economics and demographics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(5), pages 931-945.
  7. Eichholtz, Piet & Kok, Nils & Quigley, John M., 2009. "Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt507394s4, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  8. Nils Kok & Marquise McGraw & John M. Quigley, 2011. "The Diffusion of Energy Efficiency in Building," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 77-82, May.
  9. Iwaro, Joseph & Mwasha, Abraham, 2010. "A review of building energy regulation and policy for energy conservation in developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 7744-7755, December.
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