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Foreign exchange intervention in a small open economy with a long term peg

  • Mahalia Jackman

    ()

    (Central Bank of Barbados)

Central banks usually intervene in order to calm disorderly market conditions, fix exchange rate misalignments, stabilise erratic short-term exchange rate fluctuations, or quell the excess demand/supply of FX. Under a floating regime, the size and timing of intervention are critical policy decisions. But, in an economy with a fixed exchange rate – such as Barbados – FX intervention tends to be endogenous i.e., it is the FX demand and supply conditions that dictate both the timing and amount of intervention. Against this backdrop, this paper developed a model to investigate how FX market conditions dictate intervention in Barbados, small open economy which has been pegged to the US dollar for over 30 years. Results suggest that market frictions, oil prices and oil price shocks all reduce net purchases of FX, while the seasonal highs in tourism and the differential between domestic and foreign interest rates both increase net purchases.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I3-P214.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 2207-2219

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00137
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  1. Tim Bollerslev, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 1986/01, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  2. Almekinders, G.J. & Eijffinger, S.C.W., 1994. "Daily Bundesbank and federal reserve interventions : Are they a reaction to changes in the level and volatility of the DM/$-rate?," Other publications TiSEM e583abfb-39f0-4c9d-8848-5, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  3. Bollerslev, Tim & Chou, Ray Y. & Kroner, Kenneth F., 1992. "ARCH modeling in finance : A review of the theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 5-59.
  4. Ana Maria Herrera & Pinar Ozbay, 2005. "A Dynamic Model of Central Bank Intervention," Working Papers 0501, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  5. Ito, Takatoshi & Yabu, Tomoyoshi, 2007. "What prompts Japan to intervene in the Forex market? A new approach to a reaction function," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 193-212, March.
  6. Rogers, J. M. & Siklos, P. L., 2003. "Foreign exchange market intervention in two small open economies: the Canadian and Australian experience," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 393-416, June.
  7. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-152910 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Mark P. Taylor & Lucio Sarno, 2001. "Official Intervention in the Foreign Exchange Market: Is It Effective and, If So, How Does It Work?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 839-868, September.
  9. Almekinders, Geert J. & Eijffinger, Sylvester C. W., 1996. "A friction model of daily Bundesbank and Federal Reserve intervention," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(8), pages 1365-1380, September.
  10. Mahalia Jackman & Roland Craigwell & Michelle Doyle-Lowe, 2013. "Nonlinearity in the reaction of the foreign exchange market to interest rate differentials: evidence from a small open economy with a long-term peg," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 287-296, February.
  11. DeLisle Worrell & Roland Craigwell & Travis Mitchell, 2008. "The behaviour of a small foreign exchange market with a long-term peg-Barbados," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(8), pages 673-682.
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  13. Jackman M.M., 2012. "Revisiting The Tourism-Led Growth Hypothesis For Barbados: A Disaggregated Market Approach," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 12(2).
  14. Baillie, Richard T. & Osterberg, William P., 1997. "Why do central banks intervene?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 909-919, December.
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