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Efficacy of shaming penalties: Evidence from SEC football

Author

Listed:
  • Taylor P. Stevenson

    () (East Tennessee State University)

  • Robert D. Tollison

    () (Clemson University)

  • Dennis Pearson

    () (Austin Peay State University)

Abstract

Use of public humiliation as a deterrent to crime has a long history as does the debate over its effectiveness. A recent rule change in college football presents a natural experiment to test the effectiveness of so-called shaming penalties. In 2004 the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) mandated that the head official in football should announce to the crowd the jersey number of the offending player when an infraction is called. We use data from Southeastern Conference Football (2000-2007) to evaluate the effect of disclosing the offender to the public on the number of penalties called in conference play. We find a significant decrease in penalties per game after the rule change.

Suggested Citation

  • Taylor P. Stevenson & Robert D. Tollison & Dennis Pearson, 2012. "Efficacy of shaming penalties: Evidence from SEC football," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(2), pages 1162-1170.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00732
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I2-P110.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Funk, Patricia, 2004. "On the effective use of stigma as a crime-deterrent," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 715-728, August.
    2. Steven Shavell & A. Mitchell Polinsky, 2000. "The Economic Theory of Public Enforcement of Law," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 45-76.
    3. Alon Harel & Alon Klement, 2007. "The Economics of Stigma: Why More Detection of Crime May Result in Less Stigmatization," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, pages 355-377.
    4. Benson, B.L. & Kim, I. & Rasmussen, D.W., 1992. "Estimating Deterrence Effects: A Public Choice Perspective on the Economics of Crime Literature," Working Papers 1992_12_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    5. McCormick, Robert E & Tollison, Robert D, 1984. "Crime on the Court," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(2), pages 223-235, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economics of crime;

    JEL classification:

    • H0 - Public Economics - - General
    • K3 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law

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