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Do Players React To Sanction Changes? Evidence From The English Premier League

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  • Robert Witt

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact on three types of offences, red card fouls, yellow card fouls, and no-card fouls of Fédération Internationale de Football Association's introduction of a rule change in 1998 by exploiting the competitive variation in English Premier League football games over two seasons. A key result of this paper is that as more offences became eligible for red cards, the number of red cards did not increase after the introduction of the new law. The results indicate that the relationship between non-red card fouls and many of their determinants appears to have changed significantly between the 1997-8 and 1998-9 seasons. The findings in the paper are consistent with the view that an increase in the severity of the sanction associated with a tackle from behind raised the number of no-card and yellow card fouls. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Witt, 2005. "Do Players React To Sanction Changes? Evidence From The English Premier League," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(4), pages 623-640, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:4:p:623-640
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Dawson, 2014. "Refereeing and infringement of the rules," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Professional Football, chapter 24, pages 401-418 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Hlasny, V. & Kolaric, S., 2015. "Catch Me If You Can - Referee–Team Relationships and Disciplinary Cautions in Football," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 74994, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    3. Giacomo De Luca & Jeroen Schokkaert & Jo Swinnen, 2011. "Cultural Differences, Assimilation and Behavior: Player Nationality and Penalties in Football," LICOS Discussion Papers 29711, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    4. Karol Kempa & Hannes Rusch, 2016. "Misconduct and Leader Behaviour in Contests – New Evidence from European Football," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201629, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    5. Babatunde Buraimo & David Forrest & Robert Simmons, 2007. "The Twelfth Man? Refereeing Bias in English and German Soccer," Working Papers 0707, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    6. Reilly, Barry & Witt, Robert, 2011. "Disciplinary sanctions in English Premiership Football: Is there a racial dimension?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 360-370, June.
    7. Kenneth Linna & Evan Moore & Rodney Paul & Andrew Weinbach, 2014. "The Effects of the Clock and Kickoff Rule Changes on Actual and Market-Based Expected Scoring in NCAA Football," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(2), pages 1-14, April.

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