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Exchange-market pressure and currency crises in Latin America: Empirical tests of their macroeconomic determinants

  • Scott W Hegerty

    ()

    (Canisius College)

During the financial crisis of 2008, the currencies of Latin America faced pressure to devalue— which evoked memories of the “contagious” crises of the 1990s. Yet even between crises, domestic macroeconomic factors can have an impact on a country's exchange market. This study creates quarterly time series of exchange-market pressure for five Latin American countries, not only for two periods of crisis, but for the entire past decade. These series are then used in two separate analyses. The first addresses the macroeconomic determinants of this pressure, finding that current account deficits place the most pressure on a country's currency and that economic growth tends to reduce this pressure. The second study assesses the probability of a crisis, and finds that oil price drops (a global factor) might precipitate a currency crisis.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2010/Volume30/EB-10-V30-I3-P203.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 2210-2219

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-10-00355
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  1. Klein, Michael W. & Marion, Nancy P., 1997. "Explaining the duration of exchange-rate pegs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 387-404, December.
  2. Haile, Fasika & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Currency crisis contagion and the identification of transmission channels," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 572-588, October.
  3. Evan Tanner, 2001. "Exchange Market Pressure and Monetary Policy: Asia and Latin America in the 1990s," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(3), pages 2.
  4. Weymark, Diana N, 1998. "A General Approach to Measuring Exchange Market Pressure," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(1), pages 106-21, January.
  5. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Scott W. Hegerty, 2009. "The Effects of Exchange-Rate Volatility on Commodity Trade between the United States and Mexico," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 1019-1044, April.
  6. Barry Eichengreen & Andrew K. Rose & Charles Wyplosz, 1996. "Contagious Currency Crises," NBER Working Papers 5681, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. André Van Poeck & Jacques Vanneste & Maret Veiner, 2007. "Exchange Rate Regimes and Exchange Market Pressure in the New EU Member States," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45, pages 459-485, 06.
  8. Mete Feridun, 2009. "Determinants of Exchange Market Pressure in Turkey: An Econometric Investigation," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 45(2), pages 65-81, March.
  9. Weymark, Diana N, 1997. "Measuring Exchange Market Pressure and Intervention in Interdependent Economies: A Two-Country Model," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 72-82, February.
  10. Hegerty, Scott W., 2009. "Capital inflows, exchange market pressure, and credit growth in four transition economies with fixed exchange rates," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 155-167, June.
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