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An Empirical Note on Testing the Cointegration Relationship Between the Real Estate and Stock Markets in Taiwan

Author

Listed:
  • Tsangyao Chang

    () (Department of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan)

  • Yu-Chen Wei

    () (Department of Management of Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan)

  • Yang-Cheng Lu

    () (Department of Finance, Ming Chuan University, Taipei, Taiwan)

Abstract

This note studies the long-run relationship between real estate and stock markets in the Taiwan context over the 1986Q3 to 2006Q4 period, using standard cointegration test of Johansen and Juselius (1990) and that of Engle-Granger (1987) as well as the fractional cointegration test of Geweke and Porter-Hudak (1983). The results from both types of cointegration tests strongly indicate that these two markets are not cointegrated with each other. With respect to risk diversification, it is obvious that investors and financial institutions should have included both assets in the same portfolio during that period.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsangyao Chang & Yu-Chen Wei & Yang-Cheng Lu, 2007. "An Empirical Note on Testing the Cointegration Relationship Between the Real Estate and Stock Markets in Taiwan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(45), pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07c30070
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
    2. John Okunev & Patrick J. Wilson, 1997. "Using Nonlinear Tests to Examine Integration Between Real Estate and Stock Markets," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 25(3), pages 487-503.
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    5. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
    6. Perron, Pierre, 1990. "Testing for a Unit Root in a Time Series with a Changing Mean," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(2), pages 153-162, April.
    7. Abul Masih & Rumi Masih, 1997. "A comparative analysis of the propagation of stock market fluctuations in alternative models of dynamic causal linkages," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 59-74.
    8. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Lai, Kon S, 1993. "A Fractional Cointegration Analysis of Purchasing Power Parity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 11(1), pages 103-112, January.
    9. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
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    11. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    12. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
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    15. Liu, Crocker H. & Hartzell, David J. & Greig, Wylie & Grissom, Terry V., 1990. "The Integration of the Real Estate Market and the Stock Market: Some Preliminary Evidence," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 261-282, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zeng, Jhih-Hong & Peng, Chi-Lu & Chen, Ming-Chi & Lee, Chien-Chiang, 2013. "Wealth effects on the housing markets: Do market liquidity and market states matter?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 488-495.
    2. Pin-te Lin & Franz Fuerst, 2014. "The integration of direct real estate and stock markets in Asia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(12), pages 1323-1334, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

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