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Long-Term Dependencies and Long Run non-Periodic Co-Cycles: Real Estate and Stock Markets

The literature is not clear on whether there are co-dependencies domestically across real estate and stock markets, nor whether there are international co-dependencies for these asset classes, despite the importance of this question for portfolio diversification strategies. In this article, we use a non-linear technique to search for co-dependence over the long term. We find no evidence to suggest long co-memories between stock and property markets in the United States and the United Kingdom, but some evidence of this in Australia. In an international context, if we take whole of sample period data, we find no evidence of long co-memory effects, however if we sample on either side of the 1987 market correction we find evidence of long co-memory.

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Article provided by American Real Estate Society in its journal Journal of Real Estate Research.

Volume (Year): 18 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 257-278

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Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:18:n:2:1999:p:257-278
Contact details of provider: Postal: American Real Estate Society Clemson University School of Business & Behavioral Science Department of Finance 401 Sirrine Hall Clemson, SC 29634-1323
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Order Information: Postal: Diane Quarles American Real Estate Society Manager of Member Services Clemson University Box 341323 Clemson, SC 29634-1323
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