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Tax or Spend, What Causes What: Taiwan's Experience

Author

Listed:
  • Tsangyao Chang

    (Department of Economics, Feng Chia University, Taiwan)

  • Yuan-Hong Ho

    (Department of Public Finance, Feng Chia University, Taiwan)

Abstract

In this paper we tested the hypothesis of tax-and-spend, spend-and-tax, or fiscal synchronization for Taiwan using annual data covering the 1967 to 1999 period. Granger causality test results based on the corresponding vector error-correction models (ECM) suggest unidirectional causality running from government revenues to government expenditures, thus supporting the tax-and-spend hypothesis for Taiwan.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsangyao Chang & Yuan-Hong Ho, 2002. "Tax or Spend, What Causes What: Taiwan's Experience," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 1(2), pages 157-165, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijb:journl:v:1:y:2002:i:2:p:157-165
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
    2. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    3. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    4. Osterwald-Lenum, Michael, 1992. "A Note with Quantiles of the Asymptotic Distribution of the Maximum Likelihood Cointegration Rank Test Statistics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 461-472, August.
    5. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
    6. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
    7. Wu, Jyh-lin, 1998. "Are budget deficits "too large"?: The evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 519-528.
    8. Perron, Pierre, 1990. "Testing for a Unit Root in a Time Series with a Changing Mean," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(2), pages 153-162, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yuan-Hong Ho & Chiung-Ju Huang, 2009. "Tax-Spend, Spend-Tax, or Fiscal Synchronization: A Panel Analysis of the Chinese Provincial Real Data," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 5(2), pages 257-272, July.
    2. Rashid, Abdul, 2008. "Macroeconomic Variables and Stock Market Performance: Testing for Dynamic Linkages with a Known Structural Break," MPRA Paper 26937, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:ksp:journ1:v:4:y:2017:i:1:p:53-70 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Yaya Keho, 2010. "Spending Cuts or Tax Adjustments: How Can UEMOA Countries Control Their Budget Deficits?," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(3), pages 233-252, December.
    5. Yu Hsing, 2006. "Analysis of Output Fluctuations in Taiwan: An Application of the IS–MP–AS Model," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 12(2), pages 203-211, May.
    6. Scott M. Fuess, Jr. & Jack W. Hou & Meghan Millea, 2003. "Tax or Spend, What causes What? Reconsidering Taiwan's Experience," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 2(2), pages 109-119, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tax-and-spend; spend-and-tax; fiscal synchronization; Taiwan;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • H62 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Deficit; Surplus

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