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Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Sweden: A Leveraged Bootstrap Approach, 1965-2000

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  • Hatemi, A.

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  • Irandoust, M.

    ()

Abstract

The causal interaction between energy consumption, real activity and the prices in the Swedish economy is investigated over the period 1965-2000. The leveraged bootstrap simulation technique is used to generate more reliable critical values for tests of Granger causality between integrated variables. The estimation results reveal that energy consumption does not cause economic activity but rather it is caused by economic activity. Also we find that prices cause both economic activity and energy consumption without feedback causal relationship from these variables. The policy implications of these causal findings are explained.

Suggested Citation

  • Hatemi, A. & Irandoust, M., 2005. "Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Sweden: A Leveraged Bootstrap Approach, 1965-2000," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 2(4), pages 87-98.
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:ijaeqs:v:2:y2005:i:4_6
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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/economet/reviews/ijaeqs246.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Georgantopoulos, 2012. "Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: Analysis and Forecasts using VAR/VEC Approach for Greece with Capital Formation," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(4), pages 263-278.
    2. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2009. "Energy consumption and economic growth nexus in Tanzania: An ARDL bounds testing approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 617-622, February.
    3. Mustafa SAATCÝ & Yasemin DUMRUL, 2013. "The Relationship Between Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence From A Structural Break Analysis For Turkey," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(1), pages 20-29.
    4. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2010. "Energy consumption, prices and economic growth in three SSA countries: A comparative study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2463-2469, May.
    5. Mensah, Justice Tei, 2014. "Carbon emissions, energy consumption and output: A threshold analysis on the causal dynamics in emerging African economies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 172-182.
    6. Rohin Anhal, 2013. "Causality between GDP, Energy and Coal Consumption in India, 1970-2011: A Non-parametric Bootstrap Approach," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(4), pages 434-446.
    7. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mete Feridun, 2012. "Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1583-1599, August.
    8. Lorde, Troy & Waithe, Kimberly & Francis, Brian, 2010. "The importance of electrical energy for economic growth in Barbados," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1411-1420, November.
    9. Apergis, Nicholas & Tang, Chor Foon, 2013. "Is the energy-led growth hypothesis valid? New evidence from a sample of 85 countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 24-31.
    10. Aitor Ciarreta & Ainhoa Zarraga, "undated". "Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence from Spain," Energy and Environmental Modeling 2007 24000009, EcoMod.
    11. Thurai Murugan Nathan, Venus Khim-Sen Liew, Wing-Keung Wong & Venus Khim-Sen Liew & Wing-Keung Wong, 2016. "Disaggregated Energy Consumption and Sectoral Outputs in Thailand: ARDL Bound Testing Approach," Journal of Management Sciences, Geist Science, Iqra University, Faculty of Business Administration, vol. 3(1), pages 39-51, March.
    12. Yildirim, Ertugrul & Aslan, Alper, 2012. "Energy consumption and economic growth nexus for 17 highly developed OECD countries: Further evidence based on bootstrap-corrected causality tests," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 985-993.
    13. Kayhan, Selim & Adiguzel, Uğur & Bayat, Tayfur & Lebe, Fuat, 2010. "Causality Relationship between Real GDP and Electricity Consumption in Romania (2001-2010)," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 169-183, December.
    14. Salahuddin, Mohammad & Gow, Jeff, 2014. "Economic growth, energy consumption and CO2 emissions in Gulf Cooperation Council countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 44-58.
    15. Shahateet, Mohammed Issa & Al-Majali, Khalid Ali & Al-Hahabashneh, Fedel, 2014. "Causality and Cointegration between Economic Growth and Energy Consumption: Econometric Evidence from Jordan," MPRA Paper 59067, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2014.
    16. Ciarreta Antuñano, Aitor & Zárraga Alonso, Ainhoa, 2007. "Electricity consumption and economic growth: evidence from Spain," BILTOKI 2007-01, Universidad del País Vasco - Departamento de Economía Aplicada III (Econometría y Estadística).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy Consumption; Economic Growth; Leveraged Bootstrap Technique; Sweden;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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