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On the dynamics of energy consumption and employment in public and private sector


  • Tiwari, Aviral


This study intended to analyze the direction of Granger-causality between energy consumption and employment in public and private sector. We have adopted DL approach for Granger-causality analysis. We found from the whole analysis that there is evidence of bidirectional causality between energy consumption and employment in organized public and private sector. Therefore our study supports for our third testable hypothesis i.e., “feedback hypothesis”.

Suggested Citation

  • Tiwari, Aviral, 2010. "On the dynamics of energy consumption and employment in public and private sector," MPRA Paper 24076, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24076

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:rensus:v:82:y:2018:i:p3:p:3798-3807 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Mutascu, Mihai & Tiwari, Aviral Kumar, 2012. "Revisiting the Relationship between Electricity Consumption, Capital and Economic Growth: Cointegration and Causality Analysis in Romania," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 97-120, September.
    3. Germá-Bel & Stephan Josep, 2016. "“Climate Change Mitigation and the Role of Technologic Change: Impact on selected headline targets of Europe’s 2020 climate and energy package ”," IREA Working Papers 201612, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Oct 2016.
    4. repec:eco:journ2:2017-02-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Brindusa Covaci & Constantin Stoican, 2015. "Resilience of Romanian energy system in the context of Russian – European Union tensions," National Strategies Observer (NOS), Institute for World Economy, Romanian Academy, vol. 1.

    More about this item


    Energy consumption; Public and Private sector employment; Granger causality.;

    JEL classification:

    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • J48 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Particular Labor Markets; Public Policy

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