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The Nexus of Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Income: Evidence from Singapore

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  • Chew Ging LEE

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between economic growth and outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in Singapore with cointegration and Granger causality analyses. Although we find gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and outward FDI are cointegrated, there is no evidence of long run causality between these two variables because the coefficient of error correction term is either statistically insignificant or with wrong sign. With the standard Granger causality test, the results indicate that increased outward FDI leads to higher GDP per capita, but higher GDP per capita actually leads to a decline in outward FDI.

Suggested Citation

  • Chew Ging LEE, 2010. "The Nexus of Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Income: Evidence from Singapore," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:10:y:2010:i:1_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Ellingsen, Gaute & Likumahuwa, Winfried & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2006. "Outward FDI by Singapore: a different animal?," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 3947, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Shahbaz & Samia Nasreen & Talat Afza, 2014. "Environmental Consequences of Economic Growth and Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from Panel Data Analysis," Bulletin of Energy Economics (BEE), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(2), pages 14-27, June.
    2. repec:eee:phsmap:v:482:y:2017:i:c:p:127-146 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Granger Causality; Outward FDI; Income;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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