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Is nursing home demand affected by the decline in age difference between spouses?

Author

Listed:
  • Darius N. Lakdawalla

    (RAND Corporation)

  • Robert Schoeni

    (University of Michigan)

Abstract

We investigate whether declines in the age difference between spouses has influenced widowhood and nursing home demand. We first use life-table methods to simulate the impact of the declining age gap on the risk of widowhood. We then use the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey and the Census Public Use Microdata Samples to estimate the impact of widowhood, and other characteristics, on the probability of nursing home entrance. These help us estimate the impact of the declining age gap on nursing home use. We estimate that the decline in the difference in ages between spouses that took place between the birth cohorts of 1900 and 1955 may raise women's annual nursing home expenditures by about $1.4 billion, but lower men's expenditures by about $600 million.

Suggested Citation

  • Darius N. Lakdawalla & Robert Schoeni, 2003. "Is nursing home demand affected by the decline in age difference between spouses?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 8(10), pages 279-304, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:8:y:2003:i:10
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol8/10/8-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steven Stern, 1995. "Estimating Family Long-Term Care Decisions in the Presence of Endogenous Child Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 551-580.
    2. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Bagnoli, Mark, 1993. "Courtship as a Waiting Game," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 185-202, February.
    3. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Rise in Old-Age Longevity and the Market for Long-Term Care," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 295-306, March.
    4. Norton, Edward C, 1995. "Elderly Assets, Medicaid Policy, and Spend-Down in Nursing Homes," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 41(3), pages 309-329, September.
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1994:84:5:843-845_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Liliana E. Pezzin & Peter Kemper & James Reschovsky, 1996. "Does Publicly Provided Home Care Substitute for Family Care? Experimental Evidence with Endogenous Living Arrangements," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(3), pages 650-676.
    7. Ettner, Susan L, 1994. "The Effect of the Medicaid Home Care Benefit on Long-Term Care Choices of the Elderly," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 103-127, January.
    8. Lee Lillard & Constantijn Panis, 1996. "Marital status and mortality: The role of health," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(3), pages 313-327, August.
    9. Alan M. Garber & Thomas E. MaCurdy, 1990. "Predicting Nursing Home Utilization among the High-Risk Elderly," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 173-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarma, Sisira & Hawley, Gordon & Basu, Kisalaya, 2009. "Transitions in living arrangements of Canadian seniors: Findings from the NPHS longitudinal data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1106-1113, March.
    2. Henry Ergas, 2009. "Providing Aged Care: The Case for Reform," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 21-44.
    3. Charles, Kerwin Kofi & Sevak, Purvi, 2005. "Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1174-1190, November.
    4. Jean-Fran├žois Mignot, 2010. "Der Altersunterschied zwischen Ehepartnern
      [Age gaps between spouses or intimate partners]
      ," Post-Print halshs-01326705, HAL.
    5. Sarma, Sisira & Simpson, Wayne, 2007. "A panel multinomial logit analysis of elderly living arrangements: Evidence from aging in Manitoba longitudinal data, Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(12), pages 2539-2552, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aging; long-term care; marriage; nursing home;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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