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The endogenous origins of experience, routines, and organizational capabilities: the poverty of stimulus

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  • FELIN, TEPPO
  • FOSS, NICOLAI J.

Abstract

In this paper we discuss the origins and emergence of organizational routines and capabilities. We first argue that there are theoretical and endogeneity-related concerns associated with the key antecedents and mechanisms specified by the extant routines and capabilities literature. Specifically, we explicate the behaviorist and empiricist foundations of the organizational routines and capabilities literature and the extant emphasis placed on experience, repetition, and observation as the key antecedents and mechanisms of routines and capabilities. Based on this discussion we highlight several, endogeneity-related concerns, namely: (1) the problem of origins and causation, (2) the problem of extremes, (3) the problem of intentionality, (4) the problem of new knowledge, and (5) the problem of the environment. We introduce the ‘poverty of stimulus’ argument and discuss how an internalist or rationalist, choice-based approach can provide a more fruitful (though preliminary) foundation for understanding organizational behavior and capabilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Felin, Teppo & Foss, Nicolai J., 2011. "The endogenous origins of experience, routines, and organizational capabilities: the poverty of stimulus," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(02), pages 231-256, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jinsec:v:7:y:2011:i:02:p:231-256_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Mircea Epure, 2016. "Benchmarking for routines and organizational knowledge: a managerial accounting approach with performance feedback," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 87-107, August.
    2. Lazaric, Nathalie, 2011. "Organizational routines and cognition: an introduction to empirical and analytical contributions," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(02), pages 147-156, June.
    3. Roger Koppl & Stuart Kauffman & Giuseppe Longo & Teppo ­­­felin, 2015. "Economics for a creative world," Post-Print hal-01415131, HAL.
    4. Mulotte, L., 2014. "Do experience effects vary across governance modes? Evidence from new product introduction in the global aerospace industry, 1948–2000," Other publications TiSEM 2c79d4d6-2b71-4160-9781-f, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    5. Aura Parmentier Cajaiba & Giovany Cajaiba Santana, 2014. "Routines and Networks: Strengthening a Missed Link," GREDEG Working Papers 2014-41, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    6. repec:oup:indcch:v:26:y:2017:i:4:p:727-743. is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Khalil, Elias L., 2013. "Lock-in institutions and efficiency," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 27-36.
    8. Verreynne, Martie-Louise & Hine, Damian & Coote, Len & Parker, Rachel, 2016. "Building a scale for dynamic learning capabilities: The role of resources, learning, competitive intent and routine patterning," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 4287-4303.
    9. Martinkenaite, Ieva & Breunig, Karl Joachim, 2016. "The emergence of absorptive capacity through micro–macro level interactions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 700-708.
    10. Teppo Felin & Stuart Kauffman & Roger Koppl & Giuseppe Longo, 2014. "Economic Opportunity and Evolution: Beyond Landscapes and Bounded Rationality," Post-Print hal-01415115, HAL.
    11. Jaideep Anand & Louis Mulotte & Charlotte R. Ren, 2016. "Does experience imply learning?," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(7), pages 1395-1412, July.

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