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History as a laboratory to better understand the formation of institutions

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  • VAN BAVEL, BAS

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  • Van Bavel, Bas, 2015. "History as a laboratory to better understand the formation of institutions," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(01), pages 69-91, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jinsec:v:11:y:2015:i:01:p:69-91_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Henning & Erik Stam & Rik Wenting, 2013. "Path Dependence Research in Regional Economic Development: Cacophony or Knowledge Accumulation?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(8), pages 1348-1362, September.
    2. David S. Landes, 2006. "Why Europe and the West? Why Not China?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    3. Bas van Bavel & Jessica Dijkman & Erika Kuijpers & Jaco Zuijderduijn, 2011. "The Organisation of Markets as a Key Factor in the Rise of Holland, Fourteenth-Sixteenth Centuries. A Test Case for an Institutional Approach," Working Papers 0006, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    4. Oscar Gelderblom, 2013. "Cities of Commerce: The Institutional Foundations of International Trade in the Low Countries, 1250-1650," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 10139.
    5. Deirdre McCloskey, 2013. "A neo-institutionalism of measurement, without measurement: A comment on Douglas Allen’s The Institutional Revolution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 363-373, December.
    6. van Bavel, Bas, 2016. "Manors and Markets: Economy and Society in the Low Countries 500-1600," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198783756.
    7. Richard Langlois, 2013. "The Institutional Revolution: A review essay," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 383-395, December.
    8. Greif, Avner, 1994. "On the Political Foundations of the Late Medieval Commercial Revolution: Genoa During the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(02), pages 271-287, June.
    9. Joel Mokyr & José-Antonio Espín-Sánchez, 2013. "The Institutional Revelation: A comment on Douglas W. Allen’s The Institutional Revolution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 375-381, December.
    10. Allen, Robert C., 2001. "The Great Divergence in European Wages and Prices from the Middle Ages to the First World War," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 411-447, October.
    11. North, Douglass C. & Weingast, Barry R., 1989. "Constitutions and Commitment: The Evolution of Institutions Governing Public Choice in Seventeenth-Century England," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(04), pages 803-832, December.
    12. Malanima, Paolo, 2011. "The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 169-219, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Besouw, Bram & Ansink, Erik & van Bavel, Bas, 2016. "The economics of violence in natural states," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 139-156.
    2. Van Bavel, Bas & Ansink, Erik & Van Besouw, Bram, 2017. "Understanding the economics of limited access orders: incentives, organizations and the chronology of developments," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 109-131, March.
    3. van Bavel, Bas, 2016. "The Invisible Hand?: How Market Economies have Emerged and Declined Since AD 500," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199608133.

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