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Liquidity Trap in an Inflation-Targeting Framework: A Graphical Analysis

  • Pavel Kapinos


    (Carleton College)

This paper presents a simple New Keynesian model with alternative assumptions regarding the conduct of monetary policy. The central bank is assumed to either follow a Taylor rule or minimise a social welfare loss function. The model can be tractably described by means of a straightforward graphical apparatus, which, so far, has not been extended to include the treatment of the liquidity trap. The paper presents an analysis of the zero nominal interest rate bound using this apparatus and discusses the implications of pre-emptive monetary easing when the macroeconomic conditions suggest that the bound may restrict future monetary policy effectiveness.

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Article provided by Economics Network, University of Bristol in its journal International Review of Economics Education.

Volume (Year): 10 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 91-105

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Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:10:y:2011:i:2:p:91-105
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  1. Clarida, Richard & Galí, Jordi & Gertler, Mark, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 2139, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Adam, Klaus & Billi, Roberto M., 2007. "Discretionary monetary policy and the zero lower bound on nominal interest rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 728-752, April.
  3. R. Kato & S. Nishiyama, 2002. "Optimal Monetary Policy When Interest Rates are Bounded at Zero," Computing in Economics and Finance 2002 8, Society for Computational Economics.
  4. Adam, Klaus & Billi, Roberto M., 2004. "Optimal monetary policy under commitment with a zero bound on nominal interest rates," CFS Working Paper Series 2004/13, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  5. Roberto M. Billi & George A. Kahn, 2008. "What is the optimal inflation rate?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 5-28.
  6. Paul Turner, 2006. "Teaching Undergraduate Macroeconomics with the Taylor-Romer Model," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(1), pages 73-82.
  7. Seonghoon Cho & Antonio Moreno, 2005. "A Small-Sample Study of the New-Keynesian Macro Model," Faculty Working Papers 03/05, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
  8. Carlin, Wendy & Soskice, David, 2005. "Macroeconomics: Imperfections, Institutions, and Policies," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198776222, December.
  9. Ross Guest, 2003. "Modifying the Taylor-Romer Model of Macroeconomic Stabilisation for Teaching Purposes," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 2(1), pages 55-68.
  10. Peter Bofinger & Eric Mayer & Timo Wollmershäuser, 2006. "The BMW Model: A New Framework for Teaching Monetary Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 98-117, January.
  11. Rabanal, Pau & Rubio-Ramirez, Juan F., 2005. "Comparing New Keynesian models of the business cycle: A Bayesian approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1151-1166, September.
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