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Chapter 4: The Swedish Model

Author

Listed:
  • Lars Calmfors
  • Giancarlo Corsetti
  • John Hassler
  • Gilles Saint-Paul
  • Hans-Werner Sinn
  • Jan-Egbert Sturm
  • Ákos Valentinyi
  • Xavier Vives

Abstract

This chapter tries to explain the strong performance of public finances in Sweden and looks at what lessons for other countries can be drawn. Section 4.2 reviews the development of public finances over time. Section 4.3 begins by surveying the research on why fiscal policy in modern democracies may be subject to a deficit bias and then discusses how the fiscal framework established in Sweden may have helped to contain such tendencies. The importance of output growth to fiscal consolidation is highlighted in Section 4.4. Section 4.5 sums up the conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Calmfors & Giancarlo Corsetti & John Hassler & Gilles Saint-Paul & Hans-Werner Sinn & Jan-Egbert Sturm & Ákos Valentinyi & Xavier Vives, 2012. "Chapter 4: The Swedish Model," EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group Munich, vol. 0, pages 99-114, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:eeagre:v::y:2012:i::p:99-114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lars Calmfors & Simon Wren‐Lewis, 2011. "What should fiscal councils do?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(68), pages 649-695, October.
    2. Mark Hallerberg & Jürgen von Hagen, 1999. "Electoral Institutions, Cabinet Negotiations, and Budget Deficits in the European Union," NBER Chapters,in: Fiscal Institutions and Fiscal Performance, pages 209-232 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alberto Alesina & Roberto Perotti, 1995. "Fiscal Expansions and Fiscal Adjustments in OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 5214, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Alt, James E. & Lassen, David Dreyer, 2006. "Fiscal transparency, political parties, and debt in OECD countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1403-1439, August.
    5. Michael D. Bordo & Lars Jonung & Agnieszka Markiewicz, 2013. "A Fiscal Union for the Euro: Some Lessons from History ," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 59(3), pages 449-488, September.
    6. Francesca Castellani & Xavier Debrun, 2005. "Designing Macroeconomic Frameworks: A Positive Analysis of Monetary and Fiscal Delegation," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(1), pages 87-117, July.
    7. Alberto Alesina & Guido Tabellini, 1990. "A Positive Theory of Fiscal Deficits and Government Debt," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 403-414.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ágota Scharle & Balázs Váradi, 2013. "Identifying barriers to institutional change in disability services," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 41, WWWforEurope.

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