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The Applicability of the Sectoral Shift Hypothesis in the Netherlands

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  • Ivo De Loo

    (Open University of the Netherlands)

Abstract

The sectoral shift hypothesis in the Netherlands cannot be easily tested for the presence of rigorous structural breaks in the data. Therefore, a Kalman Filter approach is adopted. What we find, is that the variables capturing the sectoral shift hypothesis are the most important in explaining Dutch unemployment behavior during the postwar period. This means that cyclical unemployment in the Netherlands can be viewed as a fluctuation of the natural rate of unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivo De Loo, 2000. "The Applicability of the Sectoral Shift Hypothesis in the Netherlands," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 3, pages 57-69, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cem:jaecon:v:3:y:2000:n:1:p:57-69
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    File URL: http://www.cema.edu.ar/publicaciones/download/volume3/deloo.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lilien, David M, 1982. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 777-793, August.
    2. Garcia-Ferrer, Antonio, et al, 1987. "Macroeconomic Forecasting Using Pooled International Data," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(1), pages 53-67, January.
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & James Grant, 1979. "Econometric Studies of Labor-Labor Substitution and Their Implications for Policy," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(4), pages 543-562.
    4. Mario Fortin & Abdelkrim Araar, 1997. "Sectoral shifts, stock market dispersion and unemployment in Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(6), pages 829-839.
    5. Watson, P K, 1983. "Kalman Filtering as an Alternative to Ordinary Least Squares-Some Theoretical Considerations and Empirical Results," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 71-85.
    6. Barro, Robert J, 1977. "Unanticipated Money Growth and Unemployment in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 101-115, March.
    7. Terence Mills & Gianluigi Pelloni & Athina Zervoyianni, 1997. "Unemployment Fluctuations in the UK: 1958-92," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 253-255.
    8. Mills, Terence C. & Pelloni, Gianluigi & Zervoyianni, Athina, 1996. "Cyclical unemployment and sectoral shifts: Further tests of the Lilien hypothesis for the UK," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 55-60, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; sectoral shift hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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