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Can a Basic Income Lead to a More Gender Equal Society?

Listed author(s):
  • O'Reilly Jacqueline

    (University of Brighton)

Registered author(s):

    To assess whether basic income (BI) can address the multiple causes of gender inequalities the author reviews debates about choices of care and the concept of dependency. She evaluates complementary policies that encourage a combination of care and employment. It is not empirically clear what type of gender equality BI would result in, and whether advocates are expecting too much from one policy tool.

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    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bis.2008.3.3/bis.2008.3.3.1135/bis.2008.3.3.1135.xml?format=INT
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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Basic Income Studies.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (December)
    Pages: 1-7

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:bistud:v:3:y:2008:i:3:n:9
    Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.degruyter.com

    Order Information: Web: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bis

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    1. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning & Lupin Rahman, 2002. "Where the Minimum Wage Bites Hard: the Introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage to a Low Wage Sector," CEP Discussion Papers dp0544, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Berit Brandth & Elin Kvande, 2001. "Flexible Work and Flexible Fathers," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 15(2), pages 251-267, June.
    3. Stewart, Mark B., 2002. "The Impact of the Introduction of the UK Minimum Wage on the Employment Probabilities of Low Wage Workers," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 169, Royal Economic Society.
    4. Janneke PLANTENGA & Johan HANSEN, 1999. "Assessing equal opportunities in the European Union," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 138(4), pages 351-379, December.
    5. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2003. "A sticky floors model of promotion, pay, and gender," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-322, April.
    6. Machin, Stephen & Alan Manning & Lupin Rahman, 2003. "Where Minimum Wage Bites Hard: The Introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage to a Low Wage Sector," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 145, Royal Economic Society.
    7. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning & Lupin Rahman, 2003. "Where the Minimum Wage Bites Hard: Introduction of Minimum Wages to a Low Wage Sector," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(1), pages 154-180, 03.
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