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The Legal Grounds of Irregular Migration: A Global Game Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Naiditch Claire

    () (LEM-CNRS (UMR 9221), University of Lille, Cité Scientifique, 59655Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France)

  • Vranceanu Radu

    () (ESSEC Business School and THEMA (UMR 8184), 3 Av. Bernard Hirsch, 95021Cergy, France)

Abstract

This paper analyses the relationship between regular and irregular migration taking into account the migration network effect and the network creation mechanism. We assume that migrants can obtain a high payoff only if a critical mass of migrants is reached in the destination country. If candidates to migration receive biased signals about the economic situation of the destination country, the migrants’ decision problem can be analyzed as a standard global game. Tying the quota of regular migrants to the economic performance of countries might create large discontinuities in immigration flows, with some countries attracting the bulk of irregular migrants and the other being shunned by the migrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Naiditch Claire & Vranceanu Radu, 2017. "The Legal Grounds of Irregular Migration: A Global Game Approach," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-10, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:17:y:2017:i:2:p:10:n:2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy Hatton & Jeffery Williamson, 2002. "What Fundamentals Drive World Migration?," CEPR Discussion Papers 458, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2013. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 354-380, April.
    3. Daniel Birke, 2009. "The Economics Of Networks: A Survey Of The Empirical Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(4), pages 762-793, September.
    4. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
    5. Anna Mayda, 2010. "International migration: a panel data analysis of the determinants of bilateral flows," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(4), pages 1249-1274, September.
    6. Stéphane Mahuteau & P.N. (Raja) Junankar, 2008. "Do Migrants get Good Jobs in Australia? The Role of Ethnic Networks in Job Search," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 115-130, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    global games; irregular migration; migration policy; networks;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations

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