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Poverty, Inequality, Political Instability and Property Crimes in Pakistan: A Time Series Analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Syed Shabib Haider

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Forman Christian College (A Chartered University), Ferozepur Road Lahore-56400, Pakistan)

  • Ahmed Eatzaz

    (Department of Economics, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad, Pakistan)

Registered author(s):

    In a formal econometric analysis of crime statistics in Pakistan, this paper estimates five systems of equations determining crime rates against property, conviction rates and police and justice input using time series annual data. The study finds substantial empirical support for the model of crime, punishment and deterrence based on economic theory. The main conclusion of the study is that in the fight against crime Pakistan needs to divert resources from the provision of legal justice through various deterrence measures, like a large police force, conviction and punishment, towards the provision of social justice in the form of the fight against poverty, inequality and unemployment and maintenance of political stability. Resources also need to be diverted from punishments to apprehension of criminals.

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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Asian Journal of Law and Economics.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1-2 (December)
    Pages: 1-28

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:ajlecn:v:4:y:2013:i:1-2:p:28:n:1
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    1. Nadeem, Azhar Hassan, 2002. "Pakistan: The Political Economy of Lawlessness," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195796216.
    2. Carr-Hill, R. A. & Stern, N. H., 1973. "An econometric model of the supply and control of recorded offences in England and Wales," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 289-318.
    3. Richard B. Freeman, 1996. "Why Do So Many Young American Men Commit Crimes and What Might We Do about It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 25-42, Winter.
    4. Raphael, Steven & Winter-Ember, Rudolf, 2001. "Identifying the Effect of Unemployment on Crime," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(1), pages 259-283, April.
    5. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Antonio Merlo, 2004. "Introduction To Economic Models Of Crime," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(3), pages 677-679, 08.
    7. John Luiz, 2001. "Temporal Association, the Dynamics of Crime, and their Economic Determinants: A Time Series Econometric Model of South Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 33-61, January.
    8. Entorf, Horst & Spengler, Hannes, 2000. "Socioeconomic and demographic factors of crime in Germany: Evidence from panel data of the German states," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 75-106, March.
    9. Ayse Imrohoroglu & Antonio Merlo & Peter Rupert, 2004. "What Accounts For The Decline In Crime?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(3), pages 707-729, 08.
    10. Mathur, Vijay K, 1978. "Economics of Crime: An Investigation of the Deterrent Hypothesis for Urban Areas," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(3), pages 459-466, August.
    11. Carmichael, Fiona & Ward, Robert, 2001. "Male unemployment and crime in England and Wales," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 111-115, October.
    12. Ehrlich, Isaac, 1973. "Participation in Illegitimate Activities: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 521-565, May-June.
    13. Chien-Chieh Huang & Derek Laing & Ping Wang, 2004. "Crime And Poverty: A Search-Theoretic Approach," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(3), pages 909-938, 08.
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