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Foreign Aid and Recurrent Cost: Donor Competition, Aid Proliferation, and Budget Support

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  • Yutaka Arimoto
  • Hisaki Kono

Abstract

Recent empirical studies reveal that effectiveness of aid on growth is ambiguous. The authors consider aid proliferation-excess aid investment relative to recurrent cost-as a potential cause that undermines aid effectiveness, because aid projects can only produce sustainable benefits when sufficient recurrent costs are disbursed. They consider the donor's budget support as a device to supplement the shortage of the recipient's recurrent cost and to alleviate the misallocation of inputs. However, when donors have self-interested preferences for the success of their own projects over those conducted by others, they provide insufficient budget support relative to aid, which results in aid proliferation. Moreover, aid proliferation is shown to be worsened by the presence of more donors. Copyright © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Yutaka Arimoto & Hisaki Kono, 2009. "Foreign Aid and Recurrent Cost: Donor Competition, Aid Proliferation, and Budget Support," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(2), pages 276-287, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:2:p:276-287
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    5. Raghav Gaiha, 2000. "On the Targeting of the Employment Guarantee Scheme in the Indian State of Maharashtra," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, pages 203-219.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hartmann, Simon, 2011. "Political constraints on division of labor in development policy across countries: A proposal for a more viable coordination procedure at the EU level," Working Papers 28, Österreichische Forschungsstiftung für Internationale Entwicklung (ÖFSE) / Austrian Foundation for Development Research.
    2. Christopher Kilby, 2013. "An Empirical Assessment of Informal Influence in the World Bank," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, pages 431-464.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:232-250 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Iñaki Aldasoro & Peter Nunnenkamp & Rainer Thiele, 2010. "Less aid proliferation and more donor coordination? The wide gap between words and deeds," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 920-940.
    5. KIMURA Hidemi & SAWADA Yasuyuki & MORI Yuko, 2007. "Aid Proliferation and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Analysis," Discussion papers 07044, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    6. Kimura, Hidemi & Mori, Yuko & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2012. "Aid Proliferation and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-10.
    7. Fløgstad, Cathrin & Hagen, Rune Jansen, 2017. "Aid Dispersion: Measurement in Principle and Practice," World Development, Elsevier, pages 232-250.
    8. Kilby, Christopher, 2011. "What Determines the Size of Aid Projects?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 1981-1994.
    9. Han, Lu & Koenig-Archibugi, Mathias, 2015. "Aid Fragmentation or Aid Pluralism? The Effect of Multiple Donors on Child Survival in Developing Countries, 1990–2010," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 344-358.

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