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Aid effecieness. Opening the black box

Author

Listed:
  • François Bourguignon

    () (Banque Mondiale - Banque Mondiale)

  • Mark Sundberg

    (Banque Mondiale - Banque Mondiale)

Abstract

This paper examines the causality chain linking aid flows to development outcomes. It argues that many of the questions policymakers and economists would like data to answer simply cannot be answered due to the complexity and "noise" along links in the chain, and the problem of attribution. It then examines what is known about aid effectiveness along different links in the causality chain. Finally, it turns to recent trends in the way aid is delivered and the new model that appears to be emerging.

Suggested Citation

  • François Bourguignon & Mark Sundberg, 2007. "Aid effecieness. Opening the black box," Post-Print halshs-00754658, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00754658
    DOI: 10.1257/aer.97.2.316
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00754658
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jacky Amprou & Patrick Guillaumont & Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney, 2007. "Aid Selectivity According to Augmented Criteria," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(5), pages 733-763, May.
    2. Svensson, Jakob, 2003. "Why conditional aid does not work and what can be done about it?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 381-402, April.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James Robinson, 2004. "Institutions as the Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 10481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Aid and Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really Show?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 643-665, November.
    5. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth," International Finance 0407010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. William Easterly & Ross Levine & David Roodman, 2003. "New Data, New Doubts: Revisiting "Aid, Policies, and Growth"," Working Papers 26, Center for Global Development.
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