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External Shocks, Balance Sheet Contagion, and Speculative Attack on the Pegged Exchange Rate System

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  • Yue Ma

Abstract

A simple monetary model is built to illustrate that the pegged exchange rate system will collapse under an unstable external environment via the balance sheet contagion and the "boiling frog" effect, even if the domestic policy and the fundamentals are sound. If agents anticipate this happening, a speculative attack may still occur. This result is different from that of the first-generation currency crisis model, where the inconsistent domestic policy brings in the collapse of the peg. The policy options to defend the peg in the author's model depend on the nature of the shock. Effective capital control can only be implemented for capital outflow shock. Capital account deregulation is more stabilizing under a current account deficit shock, however. This paper also distinguishes the effect of capital mobility with that of the asset substitutability, as they have completely different impacts on the peg. Copyright © 2008 The Author. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Yue Ma, 2009. "External Shocks, Balance Sheet Contagion, and Speculative Attack on the Pegged Exchange Rate System," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 87-98, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:1:p:87-98
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    Cited by:

    1. Inci Gumus, 2015. "Fiscal Uncertainty and Currency Crises," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 957-970, November.
    2. Inci Gumus, 2016. "Fiscal Uncertainty and Currency Crises," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 637-650, August.
    3. Alexander Karmann & Rodrigo Herrera, 2014. "Special Issue: Issues in Asia. Guest Editor: Laixun Zhao," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(2), pages 354-371, May.

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