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Refining Targeting against Poverty Evidence from Tunisia


  • Christophe Muller
  • Sami Bibi


We introduce a new methodology to target direct transfers against poverty. Our method is based on estimation methods that "focus on the poor". Using data from Tunisia, we estimate 'focused' transfer schemes that highly improve anti-poverty targeting performances. Post-transfer poverty can be substantially reduced with the new estimation method. For example, a one-third reduction in poverty severity from proxy-means test transfer schemes based on OLS method to focused transfer schemes requires only a few hours of computer work based on methods available on popular statistical packages. Finally, the obtained levels of undercoverage of the poor are particularly low. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2010.

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  • Christophe Muller & Sami Bibi, 2010. "Refining Targeting against Poverty Evidence from Tunisia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(3), pages 381-410, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:72:y:2010:i:3:p:381-410

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bah, Adama & Bazzi, Samuel & Sumarto, Sudarno & Tobias, Julia, 2014. "Finding the Poor vs. Measuring Their Poverty: Exploring the Drivers of Targeting Effectiveness in Indonesia," MPRA Paper 59759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ragui Assaad & Samir Ghazouani & Caroline Krafft, 2017. "The Composition of Labor Supply and Unemployment in Tunisia," Working Papers 1150, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2017.
    3. Christophe Muller & Asha Kannan & Roland Alcindor, 2016. "Multidimensional Poverty in Seychelles," AMSE Working Papers 1601, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Jan 2016.
    4. Mohamed Amara & Hatem Jemmali, 2015. "Household and Contextual Indicators of Poverty in Tunisia: a Multilevel Analysis," Working Papers 968, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2015.

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